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WEST VIRGINIA LOBOTOMY PROJECT

WEST VIRGINIA LOBOTOMY PROJECT The West Virginia Board of Control authorized a lobotomy project in the state hospitals in 1952. During 12 days in the summer of that year 228 patients were subjected to transorbital lobotomy. There were four fatalities, two of them due to hemorrhage and two to dehydration as proved by necropsy. A year later 85 of the patients operated on were out of the hospital. Most of these, as well as all the hospitalized ones, were studied from the standpoint of social adjustment. This was a major project, some pilot studies in previous years having yielded promising results. The program did not meet with wholehearted acceptance by relatives of patients, so that a control group was available whose relatives refused permission for operation. This control group numbered 202 patients. One year later five of these patients were out of the hospital, and two had died. Of the 195 patients remaining in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1954 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1954.02950100015007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The West Virginia Board of Control authorized a lobotomy project in the state hospitals in 1952. During 12 days in the summer of that year 228 patients were subjected to transorbital lobotomy. There were four fatalities, two of them due to hemorrhage and two to dehydration as proved by necropsy. A year later 85 of the patients operated on were out of the hospital. Most of these, as well as all the hospitalized ones, were studied from the standpoint of social adjustment. This was a major project, some pilot studies in previous years having yielded promising results. The program did not meet with wholehearted acceptance by relatives of patients, so that a control group was available whose relatives refused permission for operation. This control group numbered 202 patients. One year later five of these patients were out of the hospital, and two had died. Of the 195 patients remaining in

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 6, 1954

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