Weight-Focused Public Health Interventions—No Benefit, Some Harm

Weight-Focused Public Health Interventions—No Benefit, Some Harm Opinion EDITORIAL Tracy K. Richmond, MD, MPH; Idia B. Thurston, PhD; Kendrin R. Sonneville, ScD, RD Concern regarding childhood obesity remains a primary found inequities that drive disparities in health and weight. focus of public health officials, clinicians, individuals, and For example, BMI report cards, a widely used school-based families in the United States. Accordingly, numerous weight- childhood obesity intervention, inform parents of their child’s weight status and increase parents’ weight-related anxiety but focused public health inter- ventions, such as school- provide little guidance about evidence-based health promo- Related articles based body mass index (BMI) tion strategies and offer no structural support for behavior screenings and report cards change. Furthermore, weight-focused health promotion ap- sent home to notify parents of their child’s weight status, have proaches fail to consider that behavioral changes made for the been developed. Although the goal of these interventions is explicit purpose of weight control rarely result in health im- to reduce obesity, the percentage of youths with elevated BMIs provement or sustainable weight loss and are instead asso- 1 7 has continued to grow, and, correspondingly, so too has the ciated with disordered eating and greater weight gain. 3 4 percentage of youths experiencing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Weight-Focused Public Health Interventions—No Benefit, Some Harm

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.4777
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Tracy K. Richmond, MD, MPH; Idia B. Thurston, PhD; Kendrin R. Sonneville, ScD, RD Concern regarding childhood obesity remains a primary found inequities that drive disparities in health and weight. focus of public health officials, clinicians, individuals, and For example, BMI report cards, a widely used school-based families in the United States. Accordingly, numerous weight- childhood obesity intervention, inform parents of their child’s weight status and increase parents’ weight-related anxiety but focused public health inter- ventions, such as school- provide little guidance about evidence-based health promo- Related articles based body mass index (BMI) tion strategies and offer no structural support for behavior screenings and report cards change. Furthermore, weight-focused health promotion ap- sent home to notify parents of their child’s weight status, have proaches fail to consider that behavioral changes made for the been developed. Although the goal of these interventions is explicit purpose of weight control rarely result in health im- to reduce obesity, the percentage of youths with elevated BMIs provement or sustainable weight loss and are instead asso- 1 7 has continued to grow, and, correspondingly, so too has the ciated with disordered eating and greater weight gain. 3 4 percentage of youths experiencing

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 16, 2021

References

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