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Water Safety

Water Safety A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report criticized the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for deciding not to regulate any new possible drinking water contaminants, with one recent exception, since the Safe Drinking Water Act was amended in 1996. Perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel, is the only contaminant added to US government regulation of drinking water since 1996. The amendments to the Act say that every 5 years the EPA is to select for consideration of regulation at least 5 contaminants that present the greatest public health concern. Between 2003 and 2008, the EPA considered a total of 20 contaminants and decided to not regulate any of them. The GAO report, released July 12, also criticized the agency's 2008 decision to not regulate perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel; the EPA reversed its perchlorate decision earlier this year. The GAO indicated that in 2008, during the Bush administration, the EPA used a process and scientific analyses that were atypical, lacked transparency, and limited the agency's independence in developing and communicating scientific findings. The GAO report also stated that EPA scientists who managed the sensitivity analysis for perchlorate did not agree that it supported the conclusion that the selected exposure level was protective of all populations, including children and pregnant women (http://tinyurl.com/3pllwep). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Water Safety

JAMA , Volume 306 (10) – Sep 14, 2011

Water Safety

Abstract

A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report criticized the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for deciding not to regulate any new possible drinking water contaminants, with one recent exception, since the Safe Drinking Water Act was amended in 1996. Perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel, is the only contaminant added to US government regulation of drinking water since 1996. The amendments to the Act say that every 5 years the EPA is to select for consideration of regulation at least...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2011.1252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report criticized the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for deciding not to regulate any new possible drinking water contaminants, with one recent exception, since the Safe Drinking Water Act was amended in 1996. Perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel, is the only contaminant added to US government regulation of drinking water since 1996. The amendments to the Act say that every 5 years the EPA is to select for consideration of regulation at least 5 contaminants that present the greatest public health concern. Between 2003 and 2008, the EPA considered a total of 20 contaminants and decided to not regulate any of them. The GAO report, released July 12, also criticized the agency's 2008 decision to not regulate perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel; the EPA reversed its perchlorate decision earlier this year. The GAO indicated that in 2008, during the Bush administration, the EPA used a process and scientific analyses that were atypical, lacked transparency, and limited the agency's independence in developing and communicating scientific findings. The GAO report also stated that EPA scientists who managed the sensitivity analysis for perchlorate did not agree that it supported the conclusion that the selected exposure level was protective of all populations, including children and pregnant women (http://tinyurl.com/3pllwep).

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 14, 2011

Keywords: water safety

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