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Voluntary Clinical Faculty: The Hope of the Future?

Voluntary Clinical Faculty: The Hope of the Future? Abstract Consideration of the role of voluntary clinical faculty in academic health centers has been infrequent, characterized in part by a lack of data and certainly by lack of a sense of urgency as to how and where voluntary faculty should fit into teaching programs. The topic is both important and timely for several reasons. First, voluntary faculty should figure importantly in planning for the future, since such individuals obviously represent a talent pool of considerable size that should be deployed as intelligently and effectively as possible. Second, full-time faculty are increasingly pushed, for fiscal reasons, toward patient care activities at levels beyond those intrinsic to their core academic needs and, in many cases, perhaps beyond their interests in clinical practice. This trend has underscored the importance of protecting full-time faculty from excessive clinical demands for the sake of their other academic responsibilities. It has also heightened awareness of the "softness" References 1. Mendenhall RC, Tarlov AR, Girard RA, et al: A national study of internal medicine and its specialties: II. Primary care in internal medicine. Ann Intern Med 1979;91:275-287.Crossref 2. Barondess JA: Public policy and patient care: Implications for internal medicine. Am J Med 1981;70:223-226.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Voluntary Clinical Faculty: The Hope of the Future?

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 143 (2) – Feb 1, 1983

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1983.00350020164029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Consideration of the role of voluntary clinical faculty in academic health centers has been infrequent, characterized in part by a lack of data and certainly by lack of a sense of urgency as to how and where voluntary faculty should fit into teaching programs. The topic is both important and timely for several reasons. First, voluntary faculty should figure importantly in planning for the future, since such individuals obviously represent a talent pool of considerable size that should be deployed as intelligently and effectively as possible. Second, full-time faculty are increasingly pushed, for fiscal reasons, toward patient care activities at levels beyond those intrinsic to their core academic needs and, in many cases, perhaps beyond their interests in clinical practice. This trend has underscored the importance of protecting full-time faculty from excessive clinical demands for the sake of their other academic responsibilities. It has also heightened awareness of the "softness" References 1. Mendenhall RC, Tarlov AR, Girard RA, et al: A national study of internal medicine and its specialties: II. Primary care in internal medicine. Ann Intern Med 1979;91:275-287.Crossref 2. Barondess JA: Public policy and patient care: Implications for internal medicine. Am J Med 1981;70:223-226.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1983

References