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VITAMIN B REQUIREMENTS IN INFANCY

VITAMIN B REQUIREMENTS IN INFANCY The infant of today as a routine receives cod liver oil and orange juice, which furnish him with liberal amounts of vitamin A, C and D. Vitamin B is supplied in small amounts in both breast and cow's milk and in somewhat larger quantities when orange juice is also given. At no time is a substance rich in vitamin B given to the infant when he needs it most, that is, at the age when growth is greatest and when his diet is most limited. The normal child develops and grows rapidly during the first year, and most rapidly during the first three months. By the end of the fourth month, the infant has usually doubled his weight, and has tripled it by the end of the first year.1 It is obvious that during this period the infant should receive every substance conducive to optimal growth and development. McCollum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930060038005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The infant of today as a routine receives cod liver oil and orange juice, which furnish him with liberal amounts of vitamin A, C and D. Vitamin B is supplied in small amounts in both breast and cow's milk and in somewhat larger quantities when orange juice is also given. At no time is a substance rich in vitamin B given to the infant when he needs it most, that is, at the age when growth is greatest and when his diet is most limited. The normal child develops and grows rapidly during the first year, and most rapidly during the first three months. By the end of the fourth month, the infant has usually doubled his weight, and has tripled it by the end of the first year.1 It is obvious that during this period the infant should receive every substance conducive to optimal growth and development. McCollum

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1929

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