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Visuospatial Attention in Children

Visuospatial Attention in Children NEUROLOGICAL REVIEW SECTION EDITOR: DAVID E. PLEASURE, MD Sabrina E. Smith, MD, PhD; Anjan Chatterjee, MD ttention is the process by which we select stimuli in our environment for perception and action. The ability to orient to salient visual stimuli and to parse the visual world begins to emerge in the first few months of life and continues to evolve through child- A hood. This review addresses how visuospatial attention develops, is deployed, and can be damaged in children. In particular, we discuss orienting, lateralized attention, and global vs local processing. Advances in our basic understanding of the cognitive neuroscience of visuospa- tial attention are beginning to inform pediatric neurology, but much work remains to be done. Arch Neurol. 2008;65(10):1284-1288 Humans are constantly faced with more spatial attention is typically oriented sensory information than they can possi- overtly in the same direction as the eyes bly process. Attention refers to the collec- and often the head and body. However, tion of mechanisms that selects which of spatial attention can also be directed the many possible stimuli to process and covertly to a point in space that is not act on. For organisms that actively ma- aligned with the direction http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Visuospatial Attention in Children

JAMA Neurology , Volume 65 (10) – Oct 1, 2008

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/archneur.65.10.1284
pmid
18852341
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NEUROLOGICAL REVIEW SECTION EDITOR: DAVID E. PLEASURE, MD Sabrina E. Smith, MD, PhD; Anjan Chatterjee, MD ttention is the process by which we select stimuli in our environment for perception and action. The ability to orient to salient visual stimuli and to parse the visual world begins to emerge in the first few months of life and continues to evolve through child- A hood. This review addresses how visuospatial attention develops, is deployed, and can be damaged in children. In particular, we discuss orienting, lateralized attention, and global vs local processing. Advances in our basic understanding of the cognitive neuroscience of visuospa- tial attention are beginning to inform pediatric neurology, but much work remains to be done. Arch Neurol. 2008;65(10):1284-1288 Humans are constantly faced with more spatial attention is typically oriented sensory information than they can possi- overtly in the same direction as the eyes bly process. Attention refers to the collec- and often the head and body. However, tion of mechanisms that selects which of spatial attention can also be directed the many possible stimuli to process and covertly to a point in space that is not act on. For organisms that actively ma- aligned with the direction

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 2008

References