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VISUAL HALLUCINATIONS AS A CEREBRAL LOCALIZING PHENOMENON: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR OCCURRENCE IN TUMORS OF THE TEMPORAL LOBES

VISUAL HALLUCINATIONS AS A CEREBRAL LOCALIZING PHENOMENON: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR... Abstract Visual hallucinatory phenomena in cases of definitely authenticated organic disease of the brain were recorded as early as 1879 when Westphal1 cited such an instance and gave the clinical and necropsy findings. His case was in a man, aged 42, who suffered from focal epilepsy involving the left side. Before death he had developed a left hemiplegia and left homonymous hemianopia. His hallucinations consisted in seeing not only bright colors before his eyes, but on one occasion the appearance of "a sword hovering over his head, about to drop on him." At this time "he stared up at the ceiling as if he saw something horrible there." Postmortem, there was found "atrophy and softening of the posterior half of the right hemisphere." Since this early reference, numerous instances not only of color phenomena, but also of the apparent seeing of figures and objects by patients who later were shown References 1. Westphal: Charité Ann. 6:350, 1879. 2. Seguin: J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 13:5, 1886. 3. Henschen: Pathologie des Gehirns , Upsala: Almquist and Wiksells, I, II, III, IV, 1890, 1896, 1903, 1908. 4. Reinhard: Arch. f. Psychiat. 18:240, 1887. 5. Dejerine, Sollier and Auscher: Arch. de Physiol. 2:177, 184 ( (Jan.) ) 1890. 6. Wollenberg: Arch. f. Psychiat. 21:778, 1890. 7. Oppenheim and Krause: Berl. klin. Wchnschr. 43:1616, 1906. 8. Jackson: Brain 12:358, 1889-1890. 9. Beevor: Lettsom Lecture , Lancet 1:343, 491 and 718, 1907. 10. Kennedy: Nelson's System of Medicine , 1920. 11. Kennedy: Arch. Int. Med. 8:317, 1911. 12. Jolly: Berl. klin. Wchnschr. 2:42, 1902. 13. Pick: Am. J. M. Sc. 127:82, 1904. 14. De Schweinitz: New York M. J. 53:514, 1891. 15. Cushing: Brain 44:341, 1921. 16. Josefson: Deutsch. Ztschr. f. Nervenheilk. 49:341, 1913. 17. This interpretation is apparently in accord with that of Kennedy expressed in his discussion of Cushing's paper on temporal lobe tumors in the Transactions of the American Neurological Association, 1921, p. 420. In this discussion Kennedy also elaborated his theory as to why complex figure hallucinations should be provoked by irritation of the temporosphenoidal region. This theory is based on the idea that in very early life the temporosphenoidal lobes act as a storehouse for infantile memories, a function which is later taken over by other brain areas. Thus, in the early days "memory pictures may be laid down and pass into unconsciousness, only to be called back to consciousness in. the presence of gross irritation of this area." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

VISUAL HALLUCINATIONS AS A CEREBRAL LOCALIZING PHENOMENON: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR OCCURRENCE IN TUMORS OF THE TEMPORAL LOBES

Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry , Volume 10 (5) – Nov 1, 1923

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1923 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1923.02190290043005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Visual hallucinatory phenomena in cases of definitely authenticated organic disease of the brain were recorded as early as 1879 when Westphal1 cited such an instance and gave the clinical and necropsy findings. His case was in a man, aged 42, who suffered from focal epilepsy involving the left side. Before death he had developed a left hemiplegia and left homonymous hemianopia. His hallucinations consisted in seeing not only bright colors before his eyes, but on one occasion the appearance of "a sword hovering over his head, about to drop on him." At this time "he stared up at the ceiling as if he saw something horrible there." Postmortem, there was found "atrophy and softening of the posterior half of the right hemisphere." Since this early reference, numerous instances not only of color phenomena, but also of the apparent seeing of figures and objects by patients who later were shown References 1. Westphal: Charité Ann. 6:350, 1879. 2. Seguin: J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 13:5, 1886. 3. Henschen: Pathologie des Gehirns , Upsala: Almquist and Wiksells, I, II, III, IV, 1890, 1896, 1903, 1908. 4. Reinhard: Arch. f. Psychiat. 18:240, 1887. 5. Dejerine, Sollier and Auscher: Arch. de Physiol. 2:177, 184 ( (Jan.) ) 1890. 6. Wollenberg: Arch. f. Psychiat. 21:778, 1890. 7. Oppenheim and Krause: Berl. klin. Wchnschr. 43:1616, 1906. 8. Jackson: Brain 12:358, 1889-1890. 9. Beevor: Lettsom Lecture , Lancet 1:343, 491 and 718, 1907. 10. Kennedy: Nelson's System of Medicine , 1920. 11. Kennedy: Arch. Int. Med. 8:317, 1911. 12. Jolly: Berl. klin. Wchnschr. 2:42, 1902. 13. Pick: Am. J. M. Sc. 127:82, 1904. 14. De Schweinitz: New York M. J. 53:514, 1891. 15. Cushing: Brain 44:341, 1921. 16. Josefson: Deutsch. Ztschr. f. Nervenheilk. 49:341, 1913. 17. This interpretation is apparently in accord with that of Kennedy expressed in his discussion of Cushing's paper on temporal lobe tumors in the Transactions of the American Neurological Association, 1921, p. 420. In this discussion Kennedy also elaborated his theory as to why complex figure hallucinations should be provoked by irritation of the temporosphenoidal region. This theory is based on the idea that in very early life the temporosphenoidal lobes act as a storehouse for infantile memories, a function which is later taken over by other brain areas. Thus, in the early days "memory pictures may be laid down and pass into unconsciousness, only to be called back to consciousness in. the presence of gross irritation of this area."

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1923

References