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Visual Function After Photorefractive Keratectomy

Visual Function After Photorefractive Keratectomy Abstract To the Editor. —I read with great interest the article by Sher et al1 in the November 1991 issue of the Archives and noted that limited information was provided about the methods used. No details were given on the method of test administration during which it is important to control the patient's criterion for judging visibility.2 For example, two patients may have the same contrast sensitivity, but one may require a higher objective contrast before being willing to hazard a response on a test. The most reproducible results are obtained using the forced-choice method of testing,3 in which the patient is required to give a response even if the letters or test pattern appears illegible until a predetermined number of incorrect responses are given. No details were provided about the test (Multivision Contrast Tester 8000, Visitech Consultants Inc, Dayton, Ohio), which consists of the Visitech contrast sensititivy References 1. Sher NA, Chen V, Bowers RA, et al. The use of the 193-nm excimer laser for myopic photorefractive keratectomy in sighted eyes: a multicenter study . Arch Ophthalmol . 1991;109:1525-1530.Crossref 2. Higgins KE, Jaffe MJ, Coletta NJ, et al. Spatial contrast sensitivity: importance of controlling the patient's visibility criterion . Arch Ophthalmol . 1984;102:1035-1041.Crossref 3. Vaegan, Halliday BL. A forced-choice test improves clinical contrast sensitivity testing . Br J Ophthalmol . 1982;66:477-491.Crossref 4. Rubin GS. Reliability and sensitivity of clinical contrast sensitivity tests . Clin Vis Sci . 1988;2:169-177. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Visual Function After Photorefractive Keratectomy

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 110 (8) – Aug 1, 1992

Visual Function After Photorefractive Keratectomy

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —I read with great interest the article by Sher et al1 in the November 1991 issue of the Archives and noted that limited information was provided about the methods used. No details were given on the method of test administration during which it is important to control the patient's criterion for judging visibility.2 For example, two patients may have the same contrast sensitivity, but one may require a higher objective contrast before being willing to hazard...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1992.01080200021002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —I read with great interest the article by Sher et al1 in the November 1991 issue of the Archives and noted that limited information was provided about the methods used. No details were given on the method of test administration during which it is important to control the patient's criterion for judging visibility.2 For example, two patients may have the same contrast sensitivity, but one may require a higher objective contrast before being willing to hazard a response on a test. The most reproducible results are obtained using the forced-choice method of testing,3 in which the patient is required to give a response even if the letters or test pattern appears illegible until a predetermined number of incorrect responses are given. No details were provided about the test (Multivision Contrast Tester 8000, Visitech Consultants Inc, Dayton, Ohio), which consists of the Visitech contrast sensititivy References 1. Sher NA, Chen V, Bowers RA, et al. The use of the 193-nm excimer laser for myopic photorefractive keratectomy in sighted eyes: a multicenter study . Arch Ophthalmol . 1991;109:1525-1530.Crossref 2. Higgins KE, Jaffe MJ, Coletta NJ, et al. Spatial contrast sensitivity: importance of controlling the patient's visibility criterion . Arch Ophthalmol . 1984;102:1035-1041.Crossref 3. Vaegan, Halliday BL. A forced-choice test improves clinical contrast sensitivity testing . Br J Ophthalmol . 1982;66:477-491.Crossref 4. Rubin GS. Reliability and sensitivity of clinical contrast sensitivity tests . Clin Vis Sci . 1988;2:169-177.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1992

References