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Vision Function, Functional Vision, and Depression

Vision Function, Functional Vision, and Depression EDITORIAL ISION LOSS AND DEPRESSION HAVE LONG tional vision measures outside a vision rehabilitation set- been linked but their relationship has not ting, the information conveyed through a patient’s history, been well understood. Each condition by particularly their chief concerns, cannot be ignored. itself can be life altering but, when com- Whenever patient concerns are not explained by clini- V bined, their deleterious effects may be cal findings, regardless of the measures used, look fur- compounded. In this issue of JAMA Ophthalmology, Zhang ther: vision is complex and deficits in any of its compo- et al address the relationship between vision loss and nents, however elusive, are critical to a patient’s functional depression, and they provide evidence that loss of func- status. tional vision (ie, actual task-related visual perfor- West et al found that contrast sensitivity loss as- mance) is linked to depression. This finding under- sessed with the Peli-Robson Letter Sensitivity Test (Pre- scores the importance of addressing not only the causes cision Vision), as well as decline in visual acuity, affects of vision loss but their consequences in everyday life. Their performance in everyday activities. However, they were analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Vision Function, Functional Vision, and Depression

JAMA Ophthalmology , Volume 131 (5) – May 1, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.61
pmid
23471550
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL ISION LOSS AND DEPRESSION HAVE LONG tional vision measures outside a vision rehabilitation set- been linked but their relationship has not ting, the information conveyed through a patient’s history, been well understood. Each condition by particularly their chief concerns, cannot be ignored. itself can be life altering but, when com- Whenever patient concerns are not explained by clini- V bined, their deleterious effects may be cal findings, regardless of the measures used, look fur- compounded. In this issue of JAMA Ophthalmology, Zhang ther: vision is complex and deficits in any of its compo- et al address the relationship between vision loss and nents, however elusive, are critical to a patient’s functional depression, and they provide evidence that loss of func- status. tional vision (ie, actual task-related visual perfor- West et al found that contrast sensitivity loss as- mance) is linked to depression. This finding under- sessed with the Peli-Robson Letter Sensitivity Test (Pre- scores the importance of addressing not only the causes cision Vision), as well as decline in visual acuity, affects of vision loss but their consequences in everyday life. Their performance in everyday activities. However, they were analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2013

References

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