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Vietnam Casualty Statistics: February-November, 1967

Vietnam Casualty Statistics: February-November, 1967 Abstract Wound checklists summarizing the early history and treatment of 3,954 patients have been reviewed and the information compiled. These represent a portion of the total number of patients treated during this time but are believed to reflect the overall picture because they are the accumulated figures from 16 medical facilities and were completed through the cooperation of the attending surgeons at these installations. We wish to emphasize that the individuals accounted for in this survey are patients admitted to treatment facilities. They do not reflect in any way those individuals killed in action because the latter are not brought to hospitals. Such a report would be an interesting supplement to this review. When monthly reports are compared among hospitals, the causes of wounds reflect the nature of military action. If engagements have been small arms battles, the wounds and their locations differ from those in troops that have encountered booby http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Vietnam Casualty Statistics: February-November, 1967

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1969.01340080042006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Wound checklists summarizing the early history and treatment of 3,954 patients have been reviewed and the information compiled. These represent a portion of the total number of patients treated during this time but are believed to reflect the overall picture because they are the accumulated figures from 16 medical facilities and were completed through the cooperation of the attending surgeons at these installations. We wish to emphasize that the individuals accounted for in this survey are patients admitted to treatment facilities. They do not reflect in any way those individuals killed in action because the latter are not brought to hospitals. Such a report would be an interesting supplement to this review. When monthly reports are compared among hospitals, the causes of wounds reflect the nature of military action. If engagements have been small arms battles, the wounds and their locations differ from those in troops that have encountered booby

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1969

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