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Vesical Diverticulum of the Urinary Bladder in the Female

Vesical Diverticulum of the Urinary Bladder in the Female Abstract THE OCCURRENCE of a vesical diverticulum in a female patient is not common, and the finding of more than one in the same patient is rare. Etiology. —Two theories usually are considered concerning the pathogenesis of vesical diverticulum. One is the development of an obstruction at the vesical neck in which residual urine is retained. Back pressure from the obstruction causes a bulging in a region of the vesical wall and later the formation of a diverticulum. The other theory considers a congenital weakness in a localized region in which a diverticulum forms at a subsequent date. Perhaps both of these factors contribute to the development of some diverticula. Certainly, various amounts of muscle tissue are found in diverticula when they are removed. In this regard, the case of one of our patients, a 79-year-old woman, was particularly interesting. In 1964 she had a diverticulum 7 cm in diameter that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Vesical Diverticulum of the Urinary Bladder in the Female

Archives of Surgery , Volume 92 (2) – Feb 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1966.01320200106016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE OCCURRENCE of a vesical diverticulum in a female patient is not common, and the finding of more than one in the same patient is rare. Etiology. —Two theories usually are considered concerning the pathogenesis of vesical diverticulum. One is the development of an obstruction at the vesical neck in which residual urine is retained. Back pressure from the obstruction causes a bulging in a region of the vesical wall and later the formation of a diverticulum. The other theory considers a congenital weakness in a localized region in which a diverticulum forms at a subsequent date. Perhaps both of these factors contribute to the development of some diverticula. Certainly, various amounts of muscle tissue are found in diverticula when they are removed. In this regard, the case of one of our patients, a 79-year-old woman, was particularly interesting. In 1964 she had a diverticulum 7 cm in diameter that

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1966

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