Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION IN HEARTS TOO GOOD TO DIE

VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION IN HEARTS TOO GOOD TO DIE So much has been learned about ventricular fibrillation in recent years that in the future it may be possible to reduce its incidence. However, ventricular fibrillation is still a mystery in that it has no anatomic identity. It leaves no trace when it kills. It confuses the medical intellect by killing when it should not, when anatomic disease is mild and when life appears to be safe. It stops a good heart as readily as it does a damaged heart, in infants as well as in adults. It has no respect for sex or age. It kills with or without warning. Nevertheless, positive gains have been made to prevent death and to restore life after ventricular fibrillation has occurred. One of the first encouraging signs came in 1899 from Prévost and Battelli, French physiologists, who described a method for the defibrillation of the heart of a cat in which a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION IN HEARTS TOO GOOD TO DIE

JAMA , Volume 170 (4) – May 23, 1959

VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION IN HEARTS TOO GOOD TO DIE

Abstract


So much has been learned about ventricular fibrillation in recent years that in the future it may be possible to reduce its incidence. However, ventricular fibrillation is still a mystery in that it has no anatomic identity. It leaves no trace when it kills. It confuses the medical intellect by killing when it should not, when anatomic disease is mild and when life appears to be safe. It stops a good heart as readily as it does a damaged heart, in infants as well as in adults. It has...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/ventricular-fibrillation-in-hearts-too-good-to-die-8VgQmBjzg2
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010040067017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

So much has been learned about ventricular fibrillation in recent years that in the future it may be possible to reduce its incidence. However, ventricular fibrillation is still a mystery in that it has no anatomic identity. It leaves no trace when it kills. It confuses the medical intellect by killing when it should not, when anatomic disease is mild and when life appears to be safe. It stops a good heart as readily as it does a damaged heart, in infants as well as in adults. It has no respect for sex or age. It kills with or without warning. Nevertheless, positive gains have been made to prevent death and to restore life after ventricular fibrillation has occurred. One of the first encouraging signs came in 1899 from Prévost and Battelli, French physiologists, who described a method for the defibrillation of the heart of a cat in which a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 23, 1959

There are no references for this article.