Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

VASOMOTOR CHANGES IN THE CORONARY ARTERIES AND THEIR POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE

VASOMOTOR CHANGES IN THE CORONARY ARTERIES AND THEIR POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE Just what might be "the nature and the cause" of angina pectoris has been a subject of interest and of varied opinion from the time of Heberden. Huchard, in the last quarter of the last century, listed some sixtythree various theories as to the cause. This list covered the possibilities so thoroughly that the only addition since that time has been that ascribing the source of pain to the esophagus and stomach—and not to the heart at all. Each theory has won adherents in its time, only to lose them again and then to rewin them in later decades. Each theory has had as its exponents some of the most distinguished physicians of the period. It may be said of angina pectoris in general what W. Townsend Porter said of the experimental work on the coronaries: "Seldom have the results of physiological studies been more at variance. The attentive reader http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

VASOMOTOR CHANGES IN THE CORONARY ARTERIES AND THEIR POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE

JAMA , Volume 113 (22) – Nov 25, 1939

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/vasomotor-changes-in-the-coronary-arteries-and-their-possible-mB0gdSeUQm
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1939 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1939.02800470001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Just what might be "the nature and the cause" of angina pectoris has been a subject of interest and of varied opinion from the time of Heberden. Huchard, in the last quarter of the last century, listed some sixtythree various theories as to the cause. This list covered the possibilities so thoroughly that the only addition since that time has been that ascribing the source of pain to the esophagus and stomach—and not to the heart at all. Each theory has won adherents in its time, only to lose them again and then to rewin them in later decades. Each theory has had as its exponents some of the most distinguished physicians of the period. It may be said of angina pectoris in general what W. Townsend Porter said of the experimental work on the coronaries: "Seldom have the results of physiological studies been more at variance. The attentive reader

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 25, 1939

There are no references for this article.