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USE OF THE HYPOSPRAY® IN DERMATOLOGY

USE OF THE HYPOSPRAY® IN DERMATOLOGY Abstract THE HOLLOW needle for injections has been used in medicine without many essential modifications for years. Some five years ago an experimental injector apparatus was devised which made use of spring-activated plungers and no needle. For the past two years, the Department of Dermatology of the College of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati has been interested in the adaptation of various modifications of this apparatus, called the hypospray,® in clinical and investigative dermatology. The project was assigned first to Thompson, who worked with Larrick.1 They reported their initial clinical and investigative experiments on dermatologic patients. Because of the availability of lesions of the skin, this apparatus appeared to be of value for local therapy and also for use in systemic therapy. The present report is a critical summary of our investigative and clinical experiences with recent adaptations of this instrument. The instrument is, briefly, a metal apparatus with spring-activated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & Syphilology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1951 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5979
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1951.01570090074010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE HOLLOW needle for injections has been used in medicine without many essential modifications for years. Some five years ago an experimental injector apparatus was devised which made use of spring-activated plungers and no needle. For the past two years, the Department of Dermatology of the College of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati has been interested in the adaptation of various modifications of this apparatus, called the hypospray,® in clinical and investigative dermatology. The project was assigned first to Thompson, who worked with Larrick.1 They reported their initial clinical and investigative experiments on dermatologic patients. Because of the availability of lesions of the skin, this apparatus appeared to be of value for local therapy and also for use in systemic therapy. The present report is a critical summary of our investigative and clinical experiences with recent adaptations of this instrument. The instrument is, briefly, a metal apparatus with spring-activated

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1951

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