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Use of Spacer Devices With Inhaled Steroids

Use of Spacer Devices With Inhaled Steroids Abstract I have read with interest the article "Comparison of patients' compliance with prescribed oral and inhaled asthma medications" by Kelloway et al.1 As an allergist, I am very concerned that patients are frequently noncompliant when using inhaled steroids. I am also concerned with the lack of compliance by physicians as to recommendations by authorities in the field.2-5 It is well known that a significant portion of the population cannot use metered-dose inhalers correctly without a spacer device. This is especially true of the very young and the elderly. Spacer devices decrease the adverse effects associated with the use of inhaled steroids, such as oral candidiasis and voice changes, while also increasing lung deposition. The purpose of this letter was to determine if physicians were dispensing spacer devices with inhaled steroids. To determine if patients received a spacer device with the inhaled steroids, I surveyed patients by telephone. The References 1. Kelloway JS, Wyatt RA, Adlis SA. Comparison of patients' compliance with prescribed oral and inhaled asthma medications. Arch Intern Med . 1994;154: 1349-1352.Crossref 2. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma . Bethesda, Md: Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health; 1991. 3. Utiger RD. Differences between inhaled and oral glucocorticoid therapy. N Engl J Med . 1993;329:1731-1733.Crossref 4. Toogood JH, Baskerville J, Jennings B, et al. Use of spacers to facilitate inhaled corticosteroid treatment of asthma. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1984;129:723-729. 5. Barnes PJ. A new approach to the treatment of asthma. N Engl J Med . 1989; 321:1517-1527.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Use of Spacer Devices With Inhaled Steroids

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 155 (5) – Mar 13, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1995.00430050127019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract I have read with interest the article "Comparison of patients' compliance with prescribed oral and inhaled asthma medications" by Kelloway et al.1 As an allergist, I am very concerned that patients are frequently noncompliant when using inhaled steroids. I am also concerned with the lack of compliance by physicians as to recommendations by authorities in the field.2-5 It is well known that a significant portion of the population cannot use metered-dose inhalers correctly without a spacer device. This is especially true of the very young and the elderly. Spacer devices decrease the adverse effects associated with the use of inhaled steroids, such as oral candidiasis and voice changes, while also increasing lung deposition. The purpose of this letter was to determine if physicians were dispensing spacer devices with inhaled steroids. To determine if patients received a spacer device with the inhaled steroids, I surveyed patients by telephone. The References 1. Kelloway JS, Wyatt RA, Adlis SA. Comparison of patients' compliance with prescribed oral and inhaled asthma medications. Arch Intern Med . 1994;154: 1349-1352.Crossref 2. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma . Bethesda, Md: Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health; 1991. 3. Utiger RD. Differences between inhaled and oral glucocorticoid therapy. N Engl J Med . 1993;329:1731-1733.Crossref 4. Toogood JH, Baskerville J, Jennings B, et al. Use of spacers to facilitate inhaled corticosteroid treatment of asthma. Am Rev Respir Dis . 1984;129:723-729. 5. Barnes PJ. A new approach to the treatment of asthma. N Engl J Med . 1989; 321:1517-1527.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 13, 1995

References