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USE OF SODIUM CHLORID IN TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

USE OF SODIUM CHLORID IN TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The toxemia of high intestinal obstruction results from the action of some poison, the exact source and nature of which are a matter of dispute. The toxic agent causes a marked destruction of tissue protein. Whipple1 and his associates have shown that, when the intestine of the dog is experimentally obstructed, there is an increased nitrogen excretion coincident with a high level of nonprotein and urea nitrogen in the blood. The increase of nonprotein nitrogen in the blood is due largely to the fact that the nitrogenous bodies are being formed more rapidly than they can be excreted by the kidney. Actual renal insufficiency plays only a small rôle in the intoxication in most instances. It is noteworthy that, notwithstanding the large amount of research work done on intestinal obstruction and the acceptance of the fact that the intoxication is essentially a chemical one, no advance has been made http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

USE OF SODIUM CHLORID IN TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

JAMA , Volume 82 (19) – May 10, 1924

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1924 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1924.02650450027011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The toxemia of high intestinal obstruction results from the action of some poison, the exact source and nature of which are a matter of dispute. The toxic agent causes a marked destruction of tissue protein. Whipple1 and his associates have shown that, when the intestine of the dog is experimentally obstructed, there is an increased nitrogen excretion coincident with a high level of nonprotein and urea nitrogen in the blood. The increase of nonprotein nitrogen in the blood is due largely to the fact that the nitrogenous bodies are being formed more rapidly than they can be excreted by the kidney. Actual renal insufficiency plays only a small rôle in the intoxication in most instances. It is noteworthy that, notwithstanding the large amount of research work done on intestinal obstruction and the acceptance of the fact that the intoxication is essentially a chemical one, no advance has been made

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 10, 1924

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