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Use of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in a Psychotherapeutic Setting

Use of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in a Psychotherapeutic Setting Abstract In experimental psychiatry the hallucinogenic drugs have a firmly established position; hundreds of articles attest to the growing interest in their psychotomimetic activity. As an adjunct to psychotherapy, however, their potential has been incompletely investigated. The initial mention of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD-25) in this connection appears to be the 1950 publication by Busch and Johnson,3 where the drug was described as having "profoundly influenced the course" of progress of eight cases of psychoneurosis. The remembering and reliving of early traumatic episodes were especially noted. Of subsequent researchers, Abramson1 has investigated the drug most extensively in this country. He uses LSD-25 in conjunction with analytic treatment. Patients are given small doses periodically when they appear to be at a standstill in therapy. He noted that LSD-25 is characterized by pharmacologic safety, maintenance of the patient in a conscious and cooperative state, and repetition without evidence of addiction. Frederking References 1. These compounds are acetyl and methyl analogues, respectively, of lysergic acid diethylamide. 2. Abramson, H. A.: Some Observations on Normal Volunteers and Patients , in Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and Mescaline in Experimental Psychiatry , edited by L. Cholden, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1956, p. 51. 3. Anderson, E. W., and Rawnsley, K.: Clinical Studies of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , Monatsschr. Psychiat. u. Neurol. 128:38-55, 1954.Crossref 4. Busch, A. K., and Johnson, W. C.: L. S. D. 25 as an Aid in Psychotherapy , Dis. Nerv. System 11:241-243, 1950. 5. Cohen, S.; Fichman, L., and Eisner, B. G.: Subjective Reports of Lysergic Acid Experiences in a Context of Physiological Test Performance , Am. J. Psychiat. 115:30-35, 1958. 6. Denber, H. C. B., and Merlis, S.: Studies on Mescaline: VI. Therapeutic Aspects of the Mescaline-Chlorpromazine Combination , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 122:463-469, 1955. 7. Feld, M.; Goodman, J. R., and Guido, J. A.: Clinical and Laboratory Observations on LSD-25 , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 126:176-183, 1958. 8. Frederking, W.: Intoxicant Drugs (Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide) in Psychotherapy , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 121:262-266, 1955. 9. Katzenelbogen, S., and Fang, A. D.: Narcosynthesis Effects of Sodium Amytal, Methedrine, and L. S. D-25 , Dis. Nerv. System. 14:85-88, 1953. 10. Martin, A. J.: LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide) Treatment of Chronic Psychoneurotic Patients Under Day-Hospital Conditions , Internat. J. Soc. Psychiat. 3:188-195, 1957. 11. Osmond, H.: A Review of the Clinical Effects of Psychotomimetic Agents , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 66:418-434, 1957. 12. Sandison, R. A., and Whitelaw, J. D. A.: Further Studies in the Therapeutic Value of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Mental Illness , J. Ment. Sc. 103:332-343, 1957. 13. Savage, C.: Resolution and Subsequent Remobilization of Resistance by LSD in Psychotherapy, in Psychodynamic and Therapeutic Aspects of Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 125:423-451, 1957, pp. 434-437. 14. Stevenson, I.: Comments on the Psychological Effects of Mescaline and Allied Drugs, in Psychodynamic and Therapeutic Aspects of Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 125:423-451, 1957, pp. 438-442. 15. Stoll, W.: Personal communication to the authors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

Use of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in a Psychotherapeutic Setting

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1959.02340170081008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In experimental psychiatry the hallucinogenic drugs have a firmly established position; hundreds of articles attest to the growing interest in their psychotomimetic activity. As an adjunct to psychotherapy, however, their potential has been incompletely investigated. The initial mention of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD-25) in this connection appears to be the 1950 publication by Busch and Johnson,3 where the drug was described as having "profoundly influenced the course" of progress of eight cases of psychoneurosis. The remembering and reliving of early traumatic episodes were especially noted. Of subsequent researchers, Abramson1 has investigated the drug most extensively in this country. He uses LSD-25 in conjunction with analytic treatment. Patients are given small doses periodically when they appear to be at a standstill in therapy. He noted that LSD-25 is characterized by pharmacologic safety, maintenance of the patient in a conscious and cooperative state, and repetition without evidence of addiction. Frederking References 1. These compounds are acetyl and methyl analogues, respectively, of lysergic acid diethylamide. 2. Abramson, H. A.: Some Observations on Normal Volunteers and Patients , in Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and Mescaline in Experimental Psychiatry , edited by L. Cholden, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1956, p. 51. 3. Anderson, E. W., and Rawnsley, K.: Clinical Studies of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , Monatsschr. Psychiat. u. Neurol. 128:38-55, 1954.Crossref 4. Busch, A. K., and Johnson, W. C.: L. S. D. 25 as an Aid in Psychotherapy , Dis. Nerv. System 11:241-243, 1950. 5. Cohen, S.; Fichman, L., and Eisner, B. G.: Subjective Reports of Lysergic Acid Experiences in a Context of Physiological Test Performance , Am. J. Psychiat. 115:30-35, 1958. 6. Denber, H. C. B., and Merlis, S.: Studies on Mescaline: VI. Therapeutic Aspects of the Mescaline-Chlorpromazine Combination , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 122:463-469, 1955. 7. Feld, M.; Goodman, J. R., and Guido, J. A.: Clinical and Laboratory Observations on LSD-25 , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 126:176-183, 1958. 8. Frederking, W.: Intoxicant Drugs (Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide) in Psychotherapy , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 121:262-266, 1955. 9. Katzenelbogen, S., and Fang, A. D.: Narcosynthesis Effects of Sodium Amytal, Methedrine, and L. S. D-25 , Dis. Nerv. System. 14:85-88, 1953. 10. Martin, A. J.: LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide) Treatment of Chronic Psychoneurotic Patients Under Day-Hospital Conditions , Internat. J. Soc. Psychiat. 3:188-195, 1957. 11. Osmond, H.: A Review of the Clinical Effects of Psychotomimetic Agents , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 66:418-434, 1957. 12. Sandison, R. A., and Whitelaw, J. D. A.: Further Studies in the Therapeutic Value of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Mental Illness , J. Ment. Sc. 103:332-343, 1957. 13. Savage, C.: Resolution and Subsequent Remobilization of Resistance by LSD in Psychotherapy, in Psychodynamic and Therapeutic Aspects of Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 125:423-451, 1957, pp. 434-437. 14. Stevenson, I.: Comments on the Psychological Effects of Mescaline and Allied Drugs, in Psychodynamic and Therapeutic Aspects of Mescaline and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide , J. Nerv. & Ment. Dis. 125:423-451, 1957, pp. 438-442. 15. Stoll, W.: Personal communication to the authors.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1959

References