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USE OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IRON IN THE PREVENTION OF HYPOCHROMIC ANEMIA IN INFANTS

USE OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IRON IN THE PREVENTION OF HYPOCHROMIC ANEMIA IN INFANTS THE INCIDENCE of deficiency disease in infants has decreased concurrently with increase and dissemination of nutritional knowledge. However, hypochromic anemia continues to occur commonly in the latter half of the first year of life. It is desirable, therefore, to prevent rather than treat hypochromic anemia. This study was undertaken to determine the amount and form of iron needed for this purpose. Since the studies of Elvehjem and co-workers,1 Stearns and co-workers,2 Heath and Patek,3 and McClean,4 iron preparations have been employed more frequently during the early months of postnatal life to prevent depletion of iron stores and to insure the availability of sufficient iron to maintain optimum hemoglobin values during infancy. Various amounts and types of iron have been advised as a daily dose. McClean4 recommends 50 to 60 mg. of iron daily as ferrous sulfate; Elvehjem, 25 mg. of iron daily as ferric pyrophosphate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

USE OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IRON IN THE PREVENTION OF HYPOCHROMIC ANEMIA IN INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080566001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE INCIDENCE of deficiency disease in infants has decreased concurrently with increase and dissemination of nutritional knowledge. However, hypochromic anemia continues to occur commonly in the latter half of the first year of life. It is desirable, therefore, to prevent rather than treat hypochromic anemia. This study was undertaken to determine the amount and form of iron needed for this purpose. Since the studies of Elvehjem and co-workers,1 Stearns and co-workers,2 Heath and Patek,3 and McClean,4 iron preparations have been employed more frequently during the early months of postnatal life to prevent depletion of iron stores and to insure the availability of sufficient iron to maintain optimum hemoglobin values during infancy. Various amounts and types of iron have been advised as a daily dose. McClean4 recommends 50 to 60 mg. of iron daily as ferrous sulfate; Elvehjem, 25 mg. of iron daily as ferric pyrophosphate

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1953

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