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Use of Disposable Products in Surgical Practice

Use of Disposable Products in Surgical Practice Abstract • Disposable products today are an important part of the multibillion dollar health devices industry. A few heavy-usage and low-usage examples of disposable products used by surgeons are chosen to demonstrate that in a 1,000-bed hospital, economy is rarely, if ever, a reason for converting from reusables to disposables. The actual reasons are more closely related to individual preference, availability, convenience, dependability, safety, and, in some cases, manufacturer's promotion. In a 24-hospital study of surgical apparel, it was found that only caps, masks, shoe covers, and other small items approached parity in cost between disposable and reusable items, whereas the per-use cost of reusable larger items such as gowns and drapes was still much lower than that of their disposable counterparts. However, each hospital must make its own decisions based on all factors, not on economy alone. (Arch Surg 111:20-26, 1976) References 1. Badner B, Zelner L, Merchant R, et al: A fresh look at cost of hospital laundry vs disposables . Institutional Laundry 17:8-13, 1973. 2. Badner B, Zelner L, Merchant R, et al: Costs of linen vs. disposable O.R. packs: Results of analysis of recycling and storage costs in 24 hospitals of various sizes and types . Hospitals 47:10-13, 1973. 3. Emerzian ADJ, Lehan D: A Cost Prediction Instrument for Reusable Gown Packs . Department of Industrial Administration, Storrs, University of Connecticut, 1967. 4. Emerzian ADJ, Lehan D: Analysis of OB pack costs. Hosp Management 1968, pp 16-20. 5. Jaeger RJ, Rubin RJ: Migration of a phthalate ester plasticizer from polyvinyl chloride blood bags into stored human tissue and its location in human tissues . N Engl J Med 287:1114-1118, 1972.Crossref 6. Hillman L, Goodwin SL, Sherman WR: Identification and measurement of plasticizer in neonatal tissues after umbilical catheters and blood products . N Engl J Med 292:381-386, 1975.Crossref 7. Stetson JB: Tracheostomy or prolonged intubation . Anesthesia 20:508, 1965.Crossref 8. Guess WL, et al: Parenteral toxicity of a series of dioctyl and dibutyl tin stabilizers used in PVC formulations . Tech Papers Soc Plast Engineers 12:XXV-4, 1956. 9. Guess WL, Stetson JB: Agar diffusion method for toxicity screening of plastic on cultured cell monolayers . J Pharm Sci 54:118-122, 1965.Crossref 10. Rendell-Baker L: Hazards of prolonged intubation and tracheotomy equipment , editorial. JAMA 204:162-163, 1968.Crossref 11. Laufman H, Eudy WW, Vandernoot AM, et al: Strike-through of moist contamination by woven and nonwoven surgical materials . Ann Surg 181:857-862, 1975.Crossref 12. Tinker MA, Burdman D, Deysine M, et al: Granulomatous peritonitis due to cellulose fibers from disposable surgical fabrics . Ann Surg 180:831-835, 1964. 13. Dimmick JE, Bove KE, McAdams AJ, et al: Fiber embolization—a hazard of cardiac surgery and catheterization . N Engl J Med 292:685, 1975.Crossref 14. Disposable catheters and guidewires . Contemp Surg 6:40-41, 1975. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Use of Disposable Products in Surgical Practice

Archives of Surgery , Volume 111 (1) – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1976.01360190022003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Disposable products today are an important part of the multibillion dollar health devices industry. A few heavy-usage and low-usage examples of disposable products used by surgeons are chosen to demonstrate that in a 1,000-bed hospital, economy is rarely, if ever, a reason for converting from reusables to disposables. The actual reasons are more closely related to individual preference, availability, convenience, dependability, safety, and, in some cases, manufacturer's promotion. In a 24-hospital study of surgical apparel, it was found that only caps, masks, shoe covers, and other small items approached parity in cost between disposable and reusable items, whereas the per-use cost of reusable larger items such as gowns and drapes was still much lower than that of their disposable counterparts. However, each hospital must make its own decisions based on all factors, not on economy alone. (Arch Surg 111:20-26, 1976) References 1. Badner B, Zelner L, Merchant R, et al: A fresh look at cost of hospital laundry vs disposables . Institutional Laundry 17:8-13, 1973. 2. Badner B, Zelner L, Merchant R, et al: Costs of linen vs. disposable O.R. packs: Results of analysis of recycling and storage costs in 24 hospitals of various sizes and types . Hospitals 47:10-13, 1973. 3. Emerzian ADJ, Lehan D: A Cost Prediction Instrument for Reusable Gown Packs . Department of Industrial Administration, Storrs, University of Connecticut, 1967. 4. Emerzian ADJ, Lehan D: Analysis of OB pack costs. Hosp Management 1968, pp 16-20. 5. Jaeger RJ, Rubin RJ: Migration of a phthalate ester plasticizer from polyvinyl chloride blood bags into stored human tissue and its location in human tissues . N Engl J Med 287:1114-1118, 1972.Crossref 6. Hillman L, Goodwin SL, Sherman WR: Identification and measurement of plasticizer in neonatal tissues after umbilical catheters and blood products . N Engl J Med 292:381-386, 1975.Crossref 7. Stetson JB: Tracheostomy or prolonged intubation . Anesthesia 20:508, 1965.Crossref 8. Guess WL, et al: Parenteral toxicity of a series of dioctyl and dibutyl tin stabilizers used in PVC formulations . Tech Papers Soc Plast Engineers 12:XXV-4, 1956. 9. Guess WL, Stetson JB: Agar diffusion method for toxicity screening of plastic on cultured cell monolayers . J Pharm Sci 54:118-122, 1965.Crossref 10. Rendell-Baker L: Hazards of prolonged intubation and tracheotomy equipment , editorial. JAMA 204:162-163, 1968.Crossref 11. Laufman H, Eudy WW, Vandernoot AM, et al: Strike-through of moist contamination by woven and nonwoven surgical materials . Ann Surg 181:857-862, 1975.Crossref 12. Tinker MA, Burdman D, Deysine M, et al: Granulomatous peritonitis due to cellulose fibers from disposable surgical fabrics . Ann Surg 180:831-835, 1964. 13. Dimmick JE, Bove KE, McAdams AJ, et al: Fiber embolization—a hazard of cardiac surgery and catheterization . N Engl J Med 292:685, 1975.Crossref 14. Disposable catheters and guidewires . Contemp Surg 6:40-41, 1975.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1976

References