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US Health Care Spending by Race and Ethnicity, 2002-2016

US Health Care Spending by Race and Ethnicity, 2002-2016 Key PointsQuestionHow did health care spending vary by race and ethnicity groups in the US from 2002 through 2016? FindingsThis exploratory study that included data from 7.3 million health system visits, admissions, or prescriptions found age-standardized per-person spending was significantly greater for White individuals than the all-population mean for ambulatory care; for Black individuals for emergency department and inpatient care; and for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals for emergency department care. Hispanic and Asian, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander individuals had significantly less per-person spending than did the all-population mean for most types of care, and these differences persisted when controlling for underlying health. MeaningIn the US from 2002 through 2016, there were differences in age-standardized health care spending by race and ethnicity across different types of care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2021.9937
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsQuestionHow did health care spending vary by race and ethnicity groups in the US from 2002 through 2016? FindingsThis exploratory study that included data from 7.3 million health system visits, admissions, or prescriptions found age-standardized per-person spending was significantly greater for White individuals than the all-population mean for ambulatory care; for Black individuals for emergency department and inpatient care; and for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals for emergency department care. Hispanic and Asian, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander individuals had significantly less per-person spending than did the all-population mean for most types of care, and these differences persisted when controlling for underlying health. MeaningIn the US from 2002 through 2016, there were differences in age-standardized health care spending by race and ethnicity across different types of care.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 17, 2021

References