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Urinary Tract Infection in Clinical Renal Transplantation

Urinary Tract Infection in Clinical Renal Transplantation Abstract The histories of 72 recipients of renal transplants who had been followed three months to seven years or until death, were reviewed to determine the incidence of urinary tract infection. This review was made to evaluate the role of primary diagnosis, donor source, technique of urinary drainage, urologic complications, and duration of catheter drainage in the occurrence and persistence of urinary tract infection. Definitions A urinary tract infection was defined as a quantitative determination on urine culture of greater than 100,000 pathogenic organisms per milliliter from a voided urine or catheter specimen. Repeated counts of less than 100,000 per milliliter of the same pathogen were interpreted as significant and are included as positive. Random urinary cultures of 100,000 per milliliter or less of nonpathogenic organisms such as diphtheroids, micrococcus, or Döderlein's bacillus, combined with several negative reports in the same patient, were interpreted as insignificant.Recipients of renal grafts with References 1. Rifkind, D., et al: Infectious Diseases Associated With Renal Homotransplantation . JAMA 189:397-407 ( (Aug) ) 1964. 2. Prout, G.R., Jr., et al: Some Urological Aspects of 93 Consecutive Renal Homotransplants in Modified Recipients , J Urol 97:408-425 ( (March) ) 1967. 3. MacKinnon, K.J.; Oliver, J.A.; and Morehouse, D.D.: Cadaver Renal Transplantation: Emphasis on Urological Aspects , Trans Amer Assoc Genitourin Surg 59:44-48, 1967. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Urinary Tract Infection in Clinical Renal Transplantation

Archives of Surgery , Volume 99 (4) – Oct 1, 1969

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1969.01340160054013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The histories of 72 recipients of renal transplants who had been followed three months to seven years or until death, were reviewed to determine the incidence of urinary tract infection. This review was made to evaluate the role of primary diagnosis, donor source, technique of urinary drainage, urologic complications, and duration of catheter drainage in the occurrence and persistence of urinary tract infection. Definitions A urinary tract infection was defined as a quantitative determination on urine culture of greater than 100,000 pathogenic organisms per milliliter from a voided urine or catheter specimen. Repeated counts of less than 100,000 per milliliter of the same pathogen were interpreted as significant and are included as positive. Random urinary cultures of 100,000 per milliliter or less of nonpathogenic organisms such as diphtheroids, micrococcus, or Döderlein's bacillus, combined with several negative reports in the same patient, were interpreted as insignificant.Recipients of renal grafts with References 1. Rifkind, D., et al: Infectious Diseases Associated With Renal Homotransplantation . JAMA 189:397-407 ( (Aug) ) 1964. 2. Prout, G.R., Jr., et al: Some Urological Aspects of 93 Consecutive Renal Homotransplants in Modified Recipients , J Urol 97:408-425 ( (March) ) 1967. 3. MacKinnon, K.J.; Oliver, J.A.; and Morehouse, D.D.: Cadaver Renal Transplantation: Emphasis on Urological Aspects , Trans Amer Assoc Genitourin Surg 59:44-48, 1967.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1969

References