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Unilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Unilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Abstract To the Editor.— Unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a rare cause of diplopia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and implies a unilateral lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Each of the two previously reported cases1,2 had fulminant, widely disseminated SLE that resulted in death shortly after appearance of ocular symptoms. We recently encountered a patient with long-standing but mild SLE who developed a unilateral internuclear lesion.A 49-year-old woman was admitted for diarrhea that resolved without specific therapy during her hospitalization. She reported a 32-year history of episodic, migratory swelling and pain of large and small joints and had developed Raynaud phenomenon ten years before admission. Chronic staphylococcal abscesses had affected her for four years but eventually resolved. She had no other history of symptoms suggestive of SLE.Physical examination revealed a normotensive woman with telangiectasias on her fingertips, nose, and lower lip. The skin over her fingers was shiny References 1. Bailey A, Sayer GT, Clark EC: Neuritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 75:251-259, 1956.Crossref 2. Cogan DG, Kubik CS, Smith WL: Unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia . Arch Ophthalmol 44:783-796, 1950.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Unilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Archives of Neurology , Volume 32 (7) – Jul 1, 1975

Unilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a rare cause of diplopia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and implies a unilateral lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Each of the two previously reported cases1,2 had fulminant, widely disseminated SLE that resulted in death shortly after appearance of ocular symptoms. We recently encountered a patient with long-standing but mild SLE who developed a unilateral internuclear lesion.A...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1975.00490490091013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a rare cause of diplopia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and implies a unilateral lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Each of the two previously reported cases1,2 had fulminant, widely disseminated SLE that resulted in death shortly after appearance of ocular symptoms. We recently encountered a patient with long-standing but mild SLE who developed a unilateral internuclear lesion.A 49-year-old woman was admitted for diarrhea that resolved without specific therapy during her hospitalization. She reported a 32-year history of episodic, migratory swelling and pain of large and small joints and had developed Raynaud phenomenon ten years before admission. Chronic staphylococcal abscesses had affected her for four years but eventually resolved. She had no other history of symptoms suggestive of SLE.Physical examination revealed a normotensive woman with telangiectasias on her fingertips, nose, and lower lip. The skin over her fingers was shiny References 1. Bailey A, Sayer GT, Clark EC: Neuritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 75:251-259, 1956.Crossref 2. Cogan DG, Kubik CS, Smith WL: Unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia . Arch Ophthalmol 44:783-796, 1950.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1975

References