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TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1924

TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1924 The Journal presents its thirteenth annual survey1 of typhoid fever mortality in the sixty-nine cities of the United States that had more than 100,000 population in 1920.2 In the preceding reports the cities have been grouped according to population, but this year a departure has been made and the recognized geographic divisions of the U. S. Census Bureau have been used instead. The typhoid mortality rates in previous years have been shown to bear no demonstrable relation to the size of the city population, and on the other hand there has been shown a significant connection between geographic location and typhoid mortality. It is thought that this may be brought out more clearly by a definite geographic arrangement. The cities of the New England group (Table 1) have for the most part exceedingly low typhoid rates. Two cities in this group, Fall River and Hartford, report no typhoid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1924

JAMA , Volume 84 (11) – Mar 14, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.26620370002012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal presents its thirteenth annual survey1 of typhoid fever mortality in the sixty-nine cities of the United States that had more than 100,000 population in 1920.2 In the preceding reports the cities have been grouped according to population, but this year a departure has been made and the recognized geographic divisions of the U. S. Census Bureau have been used instead. The typhoid mortality rates in previous years have been shown to bear no demonstrable relation to the size of the city population, and on the other hand there has been shown a significant connection between geographic location and typhoid mortality. It is thought that this may be brought out more clearly by a definite geographic arrangement. The cities of the New England group (Table 1) have for the most part exceedingly low typhoid rates. Two cities in this group, Fall River and Hartford, report no typhoid

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 14, 1925

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