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TYPHOID EMPYEMA

TYPHOID EMPYEMA OF THE many complications of typhoid, typhoid empyema is one of the rarest. Holt1 (1939) failed to mention typhoid empyema as a complication of typhoid, and Brennemann2 (1944) said, "Pleurisy and empyema may develop as a complication of any variety of pneumonia, though primary pleurisy is rare." Owing to the rarity of this complication and the fact that the complaints on admission were referable to the chest, this case is being reported. REPORT OF CASE R. D., a 12 year old white girl, was admitted to the Children's Free Hospital on June 24, 1942, from Gratz, Ky., with the chief complaints of "chills, fever, loss of weight and the coughing up of blood." According to the parents, the child was perfectly well until twenty-four days prior to admission, at which time she felt weak and fainted. The following day fever, chills and vomiting developed, which persisted to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1946.02020260070006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

OF THE many complications of typhoid, typhoid empyema is one of the rarest. Holt1 (1939) failed to mention typhoid empyema as a complication of typhoid, and Brennemann2 (1944) said, "Pleurisy and empyema may develop as a complication of any variety of pneumonia, though primary pleurisy is rare." Owing to the rarity of this complication and the fact that the complaints on admission were referable to the chest, this case is being reported. REPORT OF CASE R. D., a 12 year old white girl, was admitted to the Children's Free Hospital on June 24, 1942, from Gratz, Ky., with the chief complaints of "chills, fever, loss of weight and the coughing up of blood." According to the parents, the child was perfectly well until twenty-four days prior to admission, at which time she felt weak and fainted. The following day fever, chills and vomiting developed, which persisted to the

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1946

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