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TULAREMIA: A DISEASE OF INCREASING DERMATOLOGIC IMPORTANCE

TULAREMIA: A DISEASE OF INCREASING DERMATOLOGIC IMPORTANCE Abstract Prior to 1924, knowledge of tularemia was limited to fifteen cases observed and studied in the United States; since that time, however, the disease has been reported from practically every section of this country, the number of cases being about one thousand; in addition, it has been shown to occur in large numbers in Japan and Russia, and is probably of worldwide distribution. Although not essentially a disorder of the skin, tularemia has attracted an active interest among dermatologists, as shown by the excellent papers of Miller and Taussig,1 Shelmire,2 Netherton3 and Belote,4 as well as by numerous more recent reports of cases. It is no longer to be regarded as a rare disease. The most frequently occurring clinical form of this condition, the ulceroglandular type, will certainly come increasingly to the attention of dermatologists, since it always begins as a lesion of the skin, a References 1. Miller, H. E., and Taussig, L. R.: Tularemia , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 19:378 ( (March) ) 1929. 2. Shelmire, B.: Tularemia Resembling Sporotrichosis , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 19:918 ( (June) ) 1929. 3. Netherton, E. W.: Tularemia with Reference to Its Cutaneous Manifestations , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 16:170 ( (Aug.) .) 1927. 4. Belote, G. H.: Tularemia , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 23:926 ( (May) ) 1931. 5. Francis, E.: Harvey Lectures , Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1927-1928. 6. Simpson, W. M.: Tularemia , New York, Paul B. Hoeber, Inc., 1929 7. J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 15:311 ( (June) ) 1930. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

TULAREMIA: A DISEASE OF INCREASING DERMATOLOGIC IMPORTANCE

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1933 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1933.01450040673013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Prior to 1924, knowledge of tularemia was limited to fifteen cases observed and studied in the United States; since that time, however, the disease has been reported from practically every section of this country, the number of cases being about one thousand; in addition, it has been shown to occur in large numbers in Japan and Russia, and is probably of worldwide distribution. Although not essentially a disorder of the skin, tularemia has attracted an active interest among dermatologists, as shown by the excellent papers of Miller and Taussig,1 Shelmire,2 Netherton3 and Belote,4 as well as by numerous more recent reports of cases. It is no longer to be regarded as a rare disease. The most frequently occurring clinical form of this condition, the ulceroglandular type, will certainly come increasingly to the attention of dermatologists, since it always begins as a lesion of the skin, a References 1. Miller, H. E., and Taussig, L. R.: Tularemia , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 19:378 ( (March) ) 1929. 2. Shelmire, B.: Tularemia Resembling Sporotrichosis , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 19:918 ( (June) ) 1929. 3. Netherton, E. W.: Tularemia with Reference to Its Cutaneous Manifestations , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 16:170 ( (Aug.) .) 1927. 4. Belote, G. H.: Tularemia , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 23:926 ( (May) ) 1931. 5. Francis, E.: Harvey Lectures , Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1927-1928. 6. Simpson, W. M.: Tularemia , New York, Paul B. Hoeber, Inc., 1929 7. J. Lab. & Clin. Med. 15:311 ( (June) ) 1930.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1933

References