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Treatment of the Leriche Syndrome: A Technique of Endarterectomy

Treatment of the Leriche Syndrome: A Technique of Endarterectomy Abstract Truly significant advances have been made in the past eight years in our ability to successfully relieve isolated arterial occlusion. The importance of the contributions of men such as De Bakey, Linton, Wylie, Creech, and many others cannot be over emphasized. It can be said that some success has been achieved in restoring blood flow in almost every artery of significant size anywhere in the body. This does not exclude even the coronary or carotid vessels. Success depends on two factors: first, the size of the vessel, and second, the condition of the arterial bed distal to the obstruction. Small vessels, less than 3 mm. in diameter, seldom stay patent no matter what technique is used to relieve the obstruction. Thrombosis also occurs in nearly every instance where there is insufficient run-off of blood distal to the operative site. We may expect an excellent result in a vessel larger than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Treatment of the Leriche Syndrome: A Technique of Endarterectomy

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 79 (3) – Sep 1, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1959.04320090135020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Truly significant advances have been made in the past eight years in our ability to successfully relieve isolated arterial occlusion. The importance of the contributions of men such as De Bakey, Linton, Wylie, Creech, and many others cannot be over emphasized. It can be said that some success has been achieved in restoring blood flow in almost every artery of significant size anywhere in the body. This does not exclude even the coronary or carotid vessels. Success depends on two factors: first, the size of the vessel, and second, the condition of the arterial bed distal to the obstruction. Small vessels, less than 3 mm. in diameter, seldom stay patent no matter what technique is used to relieve the obstruction. Thrombosis also occurs in nearly every instance where there is insufficient run-off of blood distal to the operative site. We may expect an excellent result in a vessel larger than

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1959

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