Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Treatment of Lead Encephalopathy: The Combined Use of Edetate and Hemodialysis

Treatment of Lead Encephalopathy: The Combined Use of Edetate and Hemodialysis Abstract LEAD encephalopathy continues to have a case fatality rate of approximately 25% and to cause damage to the central nervous system in over one half of the survivors.1 The mechanisms by which lead is toxic to the body and causes encephalopathy are not fully understood. In the average case of pediatric lead poisoning, the total amount of lead stored in the body is in the range of 250 to 1,200 mg.2 Of this amount, 20 to 100 mg are extraskeletal, located in the blood and soft tissues.3 Furthermore, in untreated patients dying with lead encephalopathy, the concentration of lead in the brain is no less than 0.2 mg of lead per 100 gm of brain tissue.4 These facts suggest that the manifestations of lead encephalopathy are a direct result of the presence of lead in the brain tissues. Currently, the chelating agent calcium disodium edetate (calcium References 1. Byers, R. K.: Lead Poisoning; Review of Literature and Report on 45 Cases , Pediatrics 23:585, 1959. 2. Kehoe, R. A.: Personal communication to the authors. 3. Chisolm, J. J., and Harrison, H. E.: Exposure of Children to Lead , Pediatrics 18:943, 1956. 4. Kehoe, R. A.: Harben Lectures, 1960: Metabolism of Lead in Man in Health and Disease; III. Present Hygienic Problems Relating to Absorption of Lead , J Roy Inst Public Health 24:177, 1961. 5. Chisolm, J. J., and Harrison, H. E.: Treatment of Acute Lead Encephalopathy in Children , Pediatrics 19:2, 1957. 6. Wolf, A. V., et al: Artificial Kidney Function: Kinetics of Hemodialysis , J Clin Invest 30:1062, 1951.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Treatment of Lead Encephalopathy: The Combined Use of Edetate and Hemodialysis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/treatment-of-lead-encephalopathy-the-combined-use-of-edetate-and-PSYT0f6uhg
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090020324011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract LEAD encephalopathy continues to have a case fatality rate of approximately 25% and to cause damage to the central nervous system in over one half of the survivors.1 The mechanisms by which lead is toxic to the body and causes encephalopathy are not fully understood. In the average case of pediatric lead poisoning, the total amount of lead stored in the body is in the range of 250 to 1,200 mg.2 Of this amount, 20 to 100 mg are extraskeletal, located in the blood and soft tissues.3 Furthermore, in untreated patients dying with lead encephalopathy, the concentration of lead in the brain is no less than 0.2 mg of lead per 100 gm of brain tissue.4 These facts suggest that the manifestations of lead encephalopathy are a direct result of the presence of lead in the brain tissues. Currently, the chelating agent calcium disodium edetate (calcium References 1. Byers, R. K.: Lead Poisoning; Review of Literature and Report on 45 Cases , Pediatrics 23:585, 1959. 2. Kehoe, R. A.: Personal communication to the authors. 3. Chisolm, J. J., and Harrison, H. E.: Exposure of Children to Lead , Pediatrics 18:943, 1956. 4. Kehoe, R. A.: Harben Lectures, 1960: Metabolism of Lead in Man in Health and Disease; III. Present Hygienic Problems Relating to Absorption of Lead , J Roy Inst Public Health 24:177, 1961. 5. Chisolm, J. J., and Harrison, H. E.: Treatment of Acute Lead Encephalopathy in Children , Pediatrics 19:2, 1957. 6. Wolf, A. V., et al: Artificial Kidney Function: Kinetics of Hemodialysis , J Clin Invest 30:1062, 1951.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1965

References