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TREATMENT OF ACUTE GOUT WITH INJECTION OF COLCHICINE

TREATMENT OF ACUTE GOUT WITH INJECTION OF COLCHICINE Colchicine is one of the oldest and most specific pharmaceuticals available. While newer agents such as the corticosteroids, phenylbutazone, and probenecid are valuable in the treatment of gouty arthritis, colchicine remains the most useful drug in the treatment of this disorder. Although colchicine is a remarkably safe drug, its oral administration frequently results in nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. These manifestations act as a limiting factor and may obviate the full effectiveness of the drug. Colchicine injection is now available for intravenous administration. When the drug is given by this method, and the indicated dosage is not exceeded, gastrointestinal side-effects are rarely encountered and the response is more rapid than that obtained with the oral method. Cautious intravenous administration is also a valuable diagnostic procedure. Report of Cases Case 1.— An obese 43-year-old man developed pain and swelling of the left knee eight days after an automobile accident. There was no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

TREATMENT OF ACUTE GOUT WITH INJECTION OF COLCHICINE

JAMA , Volume 170 (12) – Jul 18, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.63010120002013a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Colchicine is one of the oldest and most specific pharmaceuticals available. While newer agents such as the corticosteroids, phenylbutazone, and probenecid are valuable in the treatment of gouty arthritis, colchicine remains the most useful drug in the treatment of this disorder. Although colchicine is a remarkably safe drug, its oral administration frequently results in nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. These manifestations act as a limiting factor and may obviate the full effectiveness of the drug. Colchicine injection is now available for intravenous administration. When the drug is given by this method, and the indicated dosage is not exceeded, gastrointestinal side-effects are rarely encountered and the response is more rapid than that obtained with the oral method. Cautious intravenous administration is also a valuable diagnostic procedure. Report of Cases Case 1.— An obese 43-year-old man developed pain and swelling of the left knee eight days after an automobile accident. There was no

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 18, 1959

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