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Traumatic Alopecia from Brush Rollers

Traumatic Alopecia from Brush Rollers Abstract An increase in the amount of hair thinning presented by women has been the subject of many articles recently in both the medical and lay press.1-3 After seeing a considerable number of these patients, particularly an interesting group whose complaint was localized patches of alopecia, I began to search for a common denominator to explain this phenomenon. Questioning these women, as to a source of trauma or injury to their scalps, they admitted to the use of brush rollers to set their hair, anchoring the roller to the scalp with a large plastic pin, provided by the manufacturer, or with a large bobby pin (Fig. 1). A relationship could be established of (1) use of brush rollers; (2) injury to the scalp with the anchoring pin; (3) development of patchy baldness. The patches of alopecia of this group of patients was typically in the midline of the scalp extending References 1. Slepyan, A. H.: Traction Alopecia , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 78:395-397 ( (Sept.) ) 1958.Crossref 2. Guy, W. B., and Edmundson, W. F.: Diffuse Cyclic Hair Loss in Women , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 81:205-207 ( (Feb.) ) 1960.Crossref 3. Sulzberger, M. B.; Witten, V. H., and Kopf, A. W.: Diffuse Alopecia in Women , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 81:556-559 ( (April) ) 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Traumatic Alopecia from Brush Rollers

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 84 (3) – Sep 1, 1961

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1961.01580150139024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An increase in the amount of hair thinning presented by women has been the subject of many articles recently in both the medical and lay press.1-3 After seeing a considerable number of these patients, particularly an interesting group whose complaint was localized patches of alopecia, I began to search for a common denominator to explain this phenomenon. Questioning these women, as to a source of trauma or injury to their scalps, they admitted to the use of brush rollers to set their hair, anchoring the roller to the scalp with a large plastic pin, provided by the manufacturer, or with a large bobby pin (Fig. 1). A relationship could be established of (1) use of brush rollers; (2) injury to the scalp with the anchoring pin; (3) development of patchy baldness. The patches of alopecia of this group of patients was typically in the midline of the scalp extending References 1. Slepyan, A. H.: Traction Alopecia , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 78:395-397 ( (Sept.) ) 1958.Crossref 2. Guy, W. B., and Edmundson, W. F.: Diffuse Cyclic Hair Loss in Women , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 81:205-207 ( (Feb.) ) 1960.Crossref 3. Sulzberger, M. B.; Witten, V. H., and Kopf, A. W.: Diffuse Alopecia in Women , A.M.A. Arch. Derm. 81:556-559 ( (April) ) 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1961

References