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Transplantation of the Spinal Cord for the Relief of Paraplegia

Transplantation of the Spinal Cord for the Relief of Paraplegia Abstract Transplantation is defined as "the grafting of tissues taken from the same body or from another" in the 22d edition of "The American Illustrated Medical Dictionary," by Dorland. Strictly speaking, therefore, the operation herein discussed is not a transplantation, but for many years the moving of a structure to a new location to improve its function has been described as transplantation; for example, transplantation of the ulnar nerve for tardy palsy of the ulnar nerve1 and transplantation of the spinal cord as described by Hyndman in 1947.2 Erb and I3 also felt the term useful and descriptive and we employed it in our paper in 1949. Transplantation of the spinal cord is most frequently employed in cases of paraplegia due to Pott's disease of the spinal column. Fortunately, owing to improved economic and hygienic levels in the United States and the introduction of agents that are destructive References 1. The professional physiatrist, the physician who has been well trained in physical therapy and rehabilitation, is, in my estimation, one of the most important members of the team. It is he who can make the efforts of the internist, neurologist, orthopedist, and neurosurgeon blossom forth in a rehabilitated person who can care for himself and be gainfully employed. Without his help the rest of the work might be in vain. Particular mention should be made of Dr. Earl Elkins, head of the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at St. Marys Hospital, for his untiring efforts in behalf of these unfortunate paraplegic patients. 2. Gay, J. R., and Love, J. G.: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tardy Paralysis of the Ulnar Nerve, Based on a Study of 100 Cases , J. Bone & Joint Surg. 29:1087-1097 ( (Oct.) ) 1947. 3. Hyndman, O. R.: Transplantation of the Spinal Cord: The Problem of Kyphoscoliosis with Cord Signs , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 84:460-464 ( (April) ) 1947. 4. Love, J. G., and Erb, H. R.: Transplantation of the Spinal Cord for Paraplegia Secondary to Pott's Disease of the Spinal Column , Arch. Surg. 59:409-421 ( (Sept.) ) 1949. 5. Seddon, H. J.: Pott's Paraplegia: Prognosis and Treatment , Brit. J. Surg. 22:769-799 ( (April) ) 1935. 6. Dott, N. M.: Skeletal Traction and Anterior Decompression in the Management of Pott's Paraplegia , Edinburgh M. J. 54:620-627 ( (Nov.-Dec.) ) 1947. 7. McKenzie, K. G., and Dewar, F. P.: Scoliosis with Paraplegia , J. Bone & Joint Surg. 31-B:162-174 ( (May) ) 1949. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Transplantation of the Spinal Cord for the Relief of Paraplegia

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 73 (5) – Nov 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1956.01280050025006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Transplantation is defined as "the grafting of tissues taken from the same body or from another" in the 22d edition of "The American Illustrated Medical Dictionary," by Dorland. Strictly speaking, therefore, the operation herein discussed is not a transplantation, but for many years the moving of a structure to a new location to improve its function has been described as transplantation; for example, transplantation of the ulnar nerve for tardy palsy of the ulnar nerve1 and transplantation of the spinal cord as described by Hyndman in 1947.2 Erb and I3 also felt the term useful and descriptive and we employed it in our paper in 1949. Transplantation of the spinal cord is most frequently employed in cases of paraplegia due to Pott's disease of the spinal column. Fortunately, owing to improved economic and hygienic levels in the United States and the introduction of agents that are destructive References 1. The professional physiatrist, the physician who has been well trained in physical therapy and rehabilitation, is, in my estimation, one of the most important members of the team. It is he who can make the efforts of the internist, neurologist, orthopedist, and neurosurgeon blossom forth in a rehabilitated person who can care for himself and be gainfully employed. Without his help the rest of the work might be in vain. Particular mention should be made of Dr. Earl Elkins, head of the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at St. Marys Hospital, for his untiring efforts in behalf of these unfortunate paraplegic patients. 2. Gay, J. R., and Love, J. G.: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tardy Paralysis of the Ulnar Nerve, Based on a Study of 100 Cases , J. Bone & Joint Surg. 29:1087-1097 ( (Oct.) ) 1947. 3. Hyndman, O. R.: Transplantation of the Spinal Cord: The Problem of Kyphoscoliosis with Cord Signs , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 84:460-464 ( (April) ) 1947. 4. Love, J. G., and Erb, H. R.: Transplantation of the Spinal Cord for Paraplegia Secondary to Pott's Disease of the Spinal Column , Arch. Surg. 59:409-421 ( (Sept.) ) 1949. 5. Seddon, H. J.: Pott's Paraplegia: Prognosis and Treatment , Brit. J. Surg. 22:769-799 ( (April) ) 1935. 6. Dott, N. M.: Skeletal Traction and Anterior Decompression in the Management of Pott's Paraplegia , Edinburgh M. J. 54:620-627 ( (Nov.-Dec.) ) 1947. 7. McKenzie, K. G., and Dewar, F. P.: Scoliosis with Paraplegia , J. Bone & Joint Surg. 31-B:162-174 ( (May) ) 1949.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1956

References

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