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Tracheal Reconstruction With Silastic Reinforced Dacron

Tracheal Reconstruction With Silastic Reinforced Dacron Abstract THE USE of synthetic materials for reconstruction of the trachea presents some special problems in that the material should be airtight and also rigid enough to remain patent during inspiration. Various materials have been used in the past, including Marlex, skin grafts, stainless steel tubes, etc.1-4 These have all had certain disadvantages, and the availability of silastic reinforced with Dacron suggested the possibility of using it for a tracheal graft. This is a translucent silicone rubber reinforced with dacron and is 0.040 inches thick. The material is very pliable and yet is rigid enough so that when it is rolled in tubular form it does not collapse. The sheet material can be rolled into any size and then glued (with RTV 732) in cylinder form either at the operating table or previously, and the material can then be autoclaved. It has very good suturing characteristics and seemed worthy of References 1. Beall, A.C., Jr., et al: Tracheal Reconstruction With Heavy Marlex Mesh , Arch Surg 86:970-978, 1963.Crossref 2. Gebauer, P.W.: Reconstructive Surgery of the Trachea and Bronchi: Late Results With Dermal Grafts , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 22:568-584, 1951. 3. Greenberg, S.D., and Willms, R.K.: Tracheal Prostheses: An Experimental Study in Dogs , Arch Otolaryng 75:335-341, 1962.Crossref 4. Yeh, T.J., et al: Metastatic Carcinoma to the Trachea: Report of a Case of Palliation by Resection and Marlex Graft , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 49:886-892, 1965. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Tracheal Reconstruction With Silastic Reinforced Dacron

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 87 (2) – Feb 1, 1968

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00760060152010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE USE of synthetic materials for reconstruction of the trachea presents some special problems in that the material should be airtight and also rigid enough to remain patent during inspiration. Various materials have been used in the past, including Marlex, skin grafts, stainless steel tubes, etc.1-4 These have all had certain disadvantages, and the availability of silastic reinforced with Dacron suggested the possibility of using it for a tracheal graft. This is a translucent silicone rubber reinforced with dacron and is 0.040 inches thick. The material is very pliable and yet is rigid enough so that when it is rolled in tubular form it does not collapse. The sheet material can be rolled into any size and then glued (with RTV 732) in cylinder form either at the operating table or previously, and the material can then be autoclaved. It has very good suturing characteristics and seemed worthy of References 1. Beall, A.C., Jr., et al: Tracheal Reconstruction With Heavy Marlex Mesh , Arch Surg 86:970-978, 1963.Crossref 2. Gebauer, P.W.: Reconstructive Surgery of the Trachea and Bronchi: Late Results With Dermal Grafts , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 22:568-584, 1951. 3. Greenberg, S.D., and Willms, R.K.: Tracheal Prostheses: An Experimental Study in Dogs , Arch Otolaryng 75:335-341, 1962.Crossref 4. Yeh, T.J., et al: Metastatic Carcinoma to the Trachea: Report of a Case of Palliation by Resection and Marlex Graft , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 49:886-892, 1965.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1968

References

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