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Tracer Probes in Steady State Systems.

Tracer Probes in Steady State Systems. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract A stream of applied mathematics has contributed markedly to the evolution of biochemistry and physiology. Gibbs and Donnan, Henderson and Hasselbalch, Stewart and Hamilton, Michaelis and Menten—names familiar to every first-year medical student—have shaped our understanding of physiological processes by explaining cellular processes on a mathematical basis. The use of tracer isotopes during the past 30 years has widened the mathematical stream into a vast river; the concepts of compartments, pools, and spaces are almost entirely derived from mathematical treatment of biological systems. Steele has made a significant contribution to the state of the art of bio-mathematics in that he has reduced to arithmetical terms the current status of tracer isotope methodology in a remarkably readable manner. Indeed, his book can be considered as almost a compendium of current knowledge in this field. From a simple model of a steady state pool, the concept of the complex parallel equivalent pools http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Tracer Probes in Steady State Systems.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 130 (4) – Oct 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.03650040179031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract A stream of applied mathematics has contributed markedly to the evolution of biochemistry and physiology. Gibbs and Donnan, Henderson and Hasselbalch, Stewart and Hamilton, Michaelis and Menten—names familiar to every first-year medical student—have shaped our understanding of physiological processes by explaining cellular processes on a mathematical basis. The use of tracer isotopes during the past 30 years has widened the mathematical stream into a vast river; the concepts of compartments, pools, and spaces are almost entirely derived from mathematical treatment of biological systems. Steele has made a significant contribution to the state of the art of bio-mathematics in that he has reduced to arithmetical terms the current status of tracer isotope methodology in a remarkably readable manner. Indeed, his book can be considered as almost a compendium of current knowledge in this field. From a simple model of a steady state pool, the concept of the complex parallel equivalent pools

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1972

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