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Toxoplasma gondii From Toxocara cati!

Toxoplasma gondii From Toxocara cati! Abstract That the protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, can pass the placental barrier to produce devastating cerebral and ocular infections of the fetus while the mother remains completely asymptomatic, is a well-recognized fact. But how does the mother acquire her infection? And what is the source of infection in acquired Toxoplasma chorioretinitis in adults? Ever since Wilder1 demonstrated that toxoplasmosis is an important cause of acquired chorioretinitis, the natural reservoir and mode of transmission of the parasite to man have remained a mystery. Animals can be infected by the oral route and since the proliferative form of Toxoplasma gondii can be excreted in the feces, it was natural to suspect fecal transmission.2 On the other hand, neither the proliferative nor the cystic forms of this parasite are sufficiently hardy to survive the external environment, and simple fecal contamination of food seemed unlikely. While carnivorous animals may acquire toxoplasmosis by eating the References 1. Wilder, H.C.: Toxoplasma Chorioretinitis in Adults , Arch Ophthal 48:127-136, 1952.Crossref 2. Jacobs, L.; Remington, J.S.; and Melton, M.L.: The Resistance of the Encysted Form of Toxoplasma gondii , J Parasitol 46:11-21, 1960.Crossref 3. Hutchison, W.M.: Experimental Transmission of Toxoplasma gondii , Nature 206:961-962, 1965.Crossref 4. Jacobs, L.: Unpublished data. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Toxoplasma gondii From Toxocara cati!

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 76 (2) – Aug 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1966.03850010161001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract That the protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, can pass the placental barrier to produce devastating cerebral and ocular infections of the fetus while the mother remains completely asymptomatic, is a well-recognized fact. But how does the mother acquire her infection? And what is the source of infection in acquired Toxoplasma chorioretinitis in adults? Ever since Wilder1 demonstrated that toxoplasmosis is an important cause of acquired chorioretinitis, the natural reservoir and mode of transmission of the parasite to man have remained a mystery. Animals can be infected by the oral route and since the proliferative form of Toxoplasma gondii can be excreted in the feces, it was natural to suspect fecal transmission.2 On the other hand, neither the proliferative nor the cystic forms of this parasite are sufficiently hardy to survive the external environment, and simple fecal contamination of food seemed unlikely. While carnivorous animals may acquire toxoplasmosis by eating the References 1. Wilder, H.C.: Toxoplasma Chorioretinitis in Adults , Arch Ophthal 48:127-136, 1952.Crossref 2. Jacobs, L.; Remington, J.S.; and Melton, M.L.: The Resistance of the Encysted Form of Toxoplasma gondii , J Parasitol 46:11-21, 1960.Crossref 3. Hutchison, W.M.: Experimental Transmission of Toxoplasma gondii , Nature 206:961-962, 1965.Crossref 4. Jacobs, L.: Unpublished data.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1966

References