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Toward a Sane and Better Future in Graduate Medical Education

Toward a Sane and Better Future in Graduate Medical Education Abstract When will we as leaders in medical education "get the picture?" When will we comprehend that our programs of graduate medical education have major flaws? The article by Irigoyen and colleagues1 in this issue of AJDC presents more evidence of the negative outcomes of graduate medical education. These outcomes may occur because we are overstressing the learner. At a time when American society is concomitantly experiencing a significant surplus of physicians and a loss of interest in our profession, those who are leaders in medical education must begin to ask questions about the structure of our programs of graduate medical education. Is it possible that the young, potential physician is "turned off" to programs of education that offer very high levels of stress, 90- to 100-hour work weeks, exposure to lethal disease, and major challenges to viable and healthy family relationships? See also p 432. Are we satisfied that the References 1. Irigoyen M, Barton D, Teets Grimm K[ill] Increased morbidity among pediatric house staff' AJDC 1987;141:432-434. 2. Physicians for the Twenty-First Century[ill] The GPEP Report . Washington, DC, Association of American Medical Colleges, 1984. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Toward a Sane and Better Future in Graduate Medical Education

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460040063014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract When will we as leaders in medical education "get the picture?" When will we comprehend that our programs of graduate medical education have major flaws? The article by Irigoyen and colleagues1 in this issue of AJDC presents more evidence of the negative outcomes of graduate medical education. These outcomes may occur because we are overstressing the learner. At a time when American society is concomitantly experiencing a significant surplus of physicians and a loss of interest in our profession, those who are leaders in medical education must begin to ask questions about the structure of our programs of graduate medical education. Is it possible that the young, potential physician is "turned off" to programs of education that offer very high levels of stress, 90- to 100-hour work weeks, exposure to lethal disease, and major challenges to viable and healthy family relationships? See also p 432. Are we satisfied that the References 1. Irigoyen M, Barton D, Teets Grimm K[ill] Increased morbidity among pediatric house staff' AJDC 1987;141:432-434. 2. Physicians for the Twenty-First Century[ill] The GPEP Report . Washington, DC, Association of American Medical Colleges, 1984.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1987

References

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