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Topically Applied Griseofulvin

Topically Applied Griseofulvin Abstract To the Editor.— Recent articles evaluating the efficacy of topically and systemically administered griseofulvin have generated interesting data, but confusing interpretations. They have demonstrated that, although topically administered griseofulvin produces stratum corneum drug levels that are two orders of magnitude greater than those produced by the oral route, the clinical response of fungal infections is seen only with systemic use of the drug. This apparent paradox, as well as results of the puzzling prophylactic studies with griseofulvin, can be explained by postulating two additional, little known, but well-verified properties of griseofulvin: first, the "cidal" effects of high doses and second, the antiinflammatory property of griseofulvin. After discussing experiments that demonstrated these two properties, we will review Epstein et al's most recent paper to explain the apparent paradoxes.1Ever since Brian, Curtis, and Hemming isolated the "curling factor" from Penicillum janczweskii, numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the References 1. Epstein WL, Shah VP, Jones HE, et al: Topically applied griseofulvin in prevention and treatment of Trichophyton mentagrophytes . Arch Dermatol 111:1293-1297, 1975.Crossref 2. Huber F, Gottlieb D: The mechanism of action of griseofulvin . Can J Microbiol 14:111-118, 1968.Crossref 3. Roth J Jr, Sallman B, Blank H: In vitro studies of the antifungal antibiotic griseofulvin . J Invest Dermatol 33:403-418, 1959.Crossref 4. Knight A: The activity of various topical griseofulvin preparations and the appearance of oral griseofulvin in the stratum corneum . Br J Dermatol 91:49-55, 1974.Crossref 5. Paget G, Wapole A: Some cytological effects of griseofulvin . Nature 182:1320-1321, 1958.Crossref 6. D'Arcy P, Howard E, Muggleton P, et al: The anti-inflammatory action of griseofulvin in experimental animals . J Pharm Pharmacol 12:659-665, 1960.Crossref 7. Cohen A, Goldman J, Kanenjon W: Treatment of shoulder-hand syndrome with griseofulvin . JAMA 173:148-150, 1960.Crossref 8. Wallace S, Nissen A: Griseofulvin in acute gout . N Engl J Med 266:1099-1101, 1962.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Topically Applied Griseofulvin

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 112 (12) – Dec 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1976.01630370069019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Recent articles evaluating the efficacy of topically and systemically administered griseofulvin have generated interesting data, but confusing interpretations. They have demonstrated that, although topically administered griseofulvin produces stratum corneum drug levels that are two orders of magnitude greater than those produced by the oral route, the clinical response of fungal infections is seen only with systemic use of the drug. This apparent paradox, as well as results of the puzzling prophylactic studies with griseofulvin, can be explained by postulating two additional, little known, but well-verified properties of griseofulvin: first, the "cidal" effects of high doses and second, the antiinflammatory property of griseofulvin. After discussing experiments that demonstrated these two properties, we will review Epstein et al's most recent paper to explain the apparent paradoxes.1Ever since Brian, Curtis, and Hemming isolated the "curling factor" from Penicillum janczweskii, numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the References 1. Epstein WL, Shah VP, Jones HE, et al: Topically applied griseofulvin in prevention and treatment of Trichophyton mentagrophytes . Arch Dermatol 111:1293-1297, 1975.Crossref 2. Huber F, Gottlieb D: The mechanism of action of griseofulvin . Can J Microbiol 14:111-118, 1968.Crossref 3. Roth J Jr, Sallman B, Blank H: In vitro studies of the antifungal antibiotic griseofulvin . J Invest Dermatol 33:403-418, 1959.Crossref 4. Knight A: The activity of various topical griseofulvin preparations and the appearance of oral griseofulvin in the stratum corneum . Br J Dermatol 91:49-55, 1974.Crossref 5. Paget G, Wapole A: Some cytological effects of griseofulvin . Nature 182:1320-1321, 1958.Crossref 6. D'Arcy P, Howard E, Muggleton P, et al: The anti-inflammatory action of griseofulvin in experimental animals . J Pharm Pharmacol 12:659-665, 1960.Crossref 7. Cohen A, Goldman J, Kanenjon W: Treatment of shoulder-hand syndrome with griseofulvin . JAMA 173:148-150, 1960.Crossref 8. Wallace S, Nissen A: Griseofulvin in acute gout . N Engl J Med 266:1099-1101, 1962.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1976

References