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TONSILLECTOMY AND ITS EFFECT ON THE SINGING VOICE

TONSILLECTOMY AND ITS EFFECT ON THE SINGING VOICE Abstract The question as to whether the singing voice is beneficially or adversely affected by removal of the faucial tonsils is of grave importance to singers. A singer whose tonsils are in such an infected condition as to be a menace to his general health, yet whose livelihood depends on his voice is faced with a decision which may well give him cause for worry. While he may know singers who have been benefited by this operation, he also probably knows or has heard of those who have suffered definite impairment of their vocal resources as the result of tonsillectomy. As is usually the case in all matters pertaining to the singing voice, accurate data are extremely difficult to obtain, and this is particularly true in regard to the question which I discuss. There is no doubt that in earlier days much damage was done to singers' throats by the removal References 1. Zerffi, W. A. C.: Functional Vocal Disabilities , Laryngoscope 49:1143-1147 ( (Nov.) ) 1939.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

TONSILLECTOMY AND ITS EFFECT ON THE SINGING VOICE

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 35 (6) – Jun 1, 1942

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1942 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1942.00670010923008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The question as to whether the singing voice is beneficially or adversely affected by removal of the faucial tonsils is of grave importance to singers. A singer whose tonsils are in such an infected condition as to be a menace to his general health, yet whose livelihood depends on his voice is faced with a decision which may well give him cause for worry. While he may know singers who have been benefited by this operation, he also probably knows or has heard of those who have suffered definite impairment of their vocal resources as the result of tonsillectomy. As is usually the case in all matters pertaining to the singing voice, accurate data are extremely difficult to obtain, and this is particularly true in regard to the question which I discuss. There is no doubt that in earlier days much damage was done to singers' throats by the removal References 1. Zerffi, W. A. C.: Functional Vocal Disabilities , Laryngoscope 49:1143-1147 ( (Nov.) ) 1939.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1942

References