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Tissue Reaction to Plastics: A Comparison of Nylon, Orlon, Dacron, Teflon, and Marlex

Tissue Reaction to Plastics: A Comparison of Nylon, Orlon, Dacron, Teflon, and Marlex Abstract Marlex 50 polyethylene is a new plastic recently developed by Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, Okla. It is significantly different in a number of important respects from the familiar "squeeze-bottle" polyethylene. The new plastic is produced from ethylene gas in a carrier solution by catalytic action at relatively low pressures. After separation from catalyst and solvent, the resulting solid product has the same appearance as conventional polyethylene. However, the new plastic has a highly crystalline molecular structure, affording an unusually high softening temperature and high tensile strength as compared with conventional material. By hot-melt extrusion at 400 to 600 F through an orifice, Marlex 50 polyethylene is readily made into monofilament. Cloth made from this fiber is impervious to water and possesses outstanding chemical resistance. It has a softening temperature of 260 F, allowing it to be sterilized in an autoclave with no damage. The tensile strength of Marlex monofilament is References 1. Jones, R. V., and Boeke, P. J.: Physical Properties of Marlex 50 Ethylene Polymer , J. Indust. & Engin. Chem. 48:1155, 1956. 2. LeVeen, H. H., and Barberio, J. R.: Tissue Reaction to Plastics Used in Surgery with Special Reference to Teflon , Ann. Surg. 129:74, 1949. 3. Miller, J. W., and Sayers, R. R.: Response of Peritoneal Tissue to Industrial Dusts , Pub. Health Rep. 56:264, 1941. 4. McCann, H.: Fibers Chart , Mod. Plastics Encycl. 35:580, 1957. 5. Smith, D. C.: Molecular Structure of Marlex Polymers , J. Indust. & Engin. Chem. 48:1161, 1956. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Tissue Reaction to Plastics: A Comparison of Nylon, Orlon, Dacron, Teflon, and Marlex

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1958.01280240155026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Marlex 50 polyethylene is a new plastic recently developed by Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, Okla. It is significantly different in a number of important respects from the familiar "squeeze-bottle" polyethylene. The new plastic is produced from ethylene gas in a carrier solution by catalytic action at relatively low pressures. After separation from catalyst and solvent, the resulting solid product has the same appearance as conventional polyethylene. However, the new plastic has a highly crystalline molecular structure, affording an unusually high softening temperature and high tensile strength as compared with conventional material. By hot-melt extrusion at 400 to 600 F through an orifice, Marlex 50 polyethylene is readily made into monofilament. Cloth made from this fiber is impervious to water and possesses outstanding chemical resistance. It has a softening temperature of 260 F, allowing it to be sterilized in an autoclave with no damage. The tensile strength of Marlex monofilament is References 1. Jones, R. V., and Boeke, P. J.: Physical Properties of Marlex 50 Ethylene Polymer , J. Indust. & Engin. Chem. 48:1155, 1956. 2. LeVeen, H. H., and Barberio, J. R.: Tissue Reaction to Plastics Used in Surgery with Special Reference to Teflon , Ann. Surg. 129:74, 1949. 3. Miller, J. W., and Sayers, R. R.: Response of Peritoneal Tissue to Industrial Dusts , Pub. Health Rep. 56:264, 1941. 4. McCann, H.: Fibers Chart , Mod. Plastics Encycl. 35:580, 1957. 5. Smith, D. C.: Molecular Structure of Marlex Polymers , J. Indust. & Engin. Chem. 48:1161, 1956.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1958

References