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Tinnitus, Psychosis, and Suicide

Tinnitus, Psychosis, and Suicide Abstract Sullivan and colleagues1 describe the successful use of nortriptyline in the treatment of depression and tinnitus. We would like to inform the readers about other connections between psychiatric disorders and tinnitus. We have seen one elderly woman who was hospitalized on an inpatient psychiatric unit because of complaints of tinnitus. She had a history of recurrent depressions. At the time of admission, she talked about "wanting to end it all" because of the tinnitus. She was agitated and hostile. She refused treatment, left the hospital against medical advice, and made a serious suicide attempt. She eventually responded well to electroconvulsive therapy. Another middle-aged patient had a paranoid disorder and also complained of tinnitus. He wrote to his psychiatrist: "... there has been a constant unnatural whine in my ears. I would like your help to put a complete stop to this cruel torture... I am normal in my reaction to References 1. Sullivan M, Katon W, Russo J, Dobie R, Sakai C. A randomized trial of nortriptyline for severe chronic tinnitus . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:2251-2259.Crossref 2. Cerletti U. Old and new information about electroshock . Am J Psychiatry. 1950; 107:87-94. 3. Fitch NR. Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation: A History of Literary Paris in the Twenties and Thirties . New York, NY: WW Norton & Co; 1983. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420200127015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sullivan and colleagues1 describe the successful use of nortriptyline in the treatment of depression and tinnitus. We would like to inform the readers about other connections between psychiatric disorders and tinnitus. We have seen one elderly woman who was hospitalized on an inpatient psychiatric unit because of complaints of tinnitus. She had a history of recurrent depressions. At the time of admission, she talked about "wanting to end it all" because of the tinnitus. She was agitated and hostile. She refused treatment, left the hospital against medical advice, and made a serious suicide attempt. She eventually responded well to electroconvulsive therapy. Another middle-aged patient had a paranoid disorder and also complained of tinnitus. He wrote to his psychiatrist: "... there has been a constant unnatural whine in my ears. I would like your help to put a complete stop to this cruel torture... I am normal in my reaction to References 1. Sullivan M, Katon W, Russo J, Dobie R, Sakai C. A randomized trial of nortriptyline for severe chronic tinnitus . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:2251-2259.Crossref 2. Cerletti U. Old and new information about electroshock . Am J Psychiatry. 1950; 107:87-94. 3. Fitch NR. Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation: A History of Literary Paris in the Twenties and Thirties . New York, NY: WW Norton & Co; 1983.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 24, 1994

References