Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

TINEA CAPITIS IN SOUTHEASTERN TENNESSEE

TINEA CAPITIS IN SOUTHEASTERN TENNESSEE This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract From time to time various authors have reported the incidence of the types of organisms causing tinea capitis in different parts of the world. So far as can be determined there have been no published reports of this nature from this section of the United States. In the face of widespread epidemics of tinea capitis currently noted in other parts of the country it is thought worth while to record the character of the disease in this area. Between July 1942 and February 1946, 22 consecutive patients with ringworm of the scalp have been seen from whom cultures of infected hairs were made. Three were Negroes and the remaining 19 were white. Their ages ranged from 2 to 9 years; 15 were boys and 7 were girls. The infections were from one week to twelve weeks in duration when first seen. In 21 cases Microsporum lanosum was cultured, while in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

TINEA CAPITIS IN SOUTHEASTERN TENNESSEE

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/tinea-capitis-in-southeastern-tennessee-4d2BGbKaJb
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1947 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1947.01520020113012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract From time to time various authors have reported the incidence of the types of organisms causing tinea capitis in different parts of the world. So far as can be determined there have been no published reports of this nature from this section of the United States. In the face of widespread epidemics of tinea capitis currently noted in other parts of the country it is thought worth while to record the character of the disease in this area. Between July 1942 and February 1946, 22 consecutive patients with ringworm of the scalp have been seen from whom cultures of infected hairs were made. Three were Negroes and the remaining 19 were white. Their ages ranged from 2 to 9 years; 15 were boys and 7 were girls. The infections were from one week to twelve weeks in duration when first seen. In 21 cases Microsporum lanosum was cultured, while in

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1947

There are no references for this article.