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Thyroid Storm

Thyroid Storm In this issue of THE JOURNAL, we are publishing a report1 of work that started 9 years ago, was concluded in December 1990, and the data from which were published in another journal in July 1995. Given that we at JAMA like to keep up-to-date and that we try never to republish what others have already put in print, the reader might well ask what is going on. The story necessary to answer this question provides a cautionary tale that illustrates the sharply differing views of research taken by the university researcher and the company sponsoring that research, if the company's product is at stake. At a time when an increasing proportion of research funding is provided by private companies,2 the story holds lessons for both, as well as for university faculties, administrators, regulatory agencies, and for physicians who prescribe on the basis of evidence. See also pp http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Thyroid Storm

JAMA , Volume 277 (15) – Apr 16, 1997

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03540390068038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of THE JOURNAL, we are publishing a report1 of work that started 9 years ago, was concluded in December 1990, and the data from which were published in another journal in July 1995. Given that we at JAMA like to keep up-to-date and that we try never to republish what others have already put in print, the reader might well ask what is going on. The story necessary to answer this question provides a cautionary tale that illustrates the sharply differing views of research taken by the university researcher and the company sponsoring that research, if the company's product is at stake. At a time when an increasing proportion of research funding is provided by private companies,2 the story holds lessons for both, as well as for university faculties, administrators, regulatory agencies, and for physicians who prescribe on the basis of evidence. See also pp

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 16, 1997

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