Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THROMBOSIS OF THE LATERAL SINUS AND JUGULAR BULB OF NONOTITIC ORIGIN

THROMBOSIS OF THE LATERAL SINUS AND JUGULAR BULB OF NONOTITIC ORIGIN The diagnosis and mode of development of thrombophlebitis of the lateral sinus are usually fairly clear. A septic temperature and chills in the course of purulent otitis media, with or without evidence of mastoiditis, suggest thrombosis either of the lateral sinus or of the jugular bulb. Positive results of blood cultures at this time, as pointed out by Libman,1 are of great significance and usually indicate that operative treatment is imperative. In all such cases the otitic infection is the start. In contrast to sinus thrombosis secondary to otitis media, I have observed two children and have been interested in a third child in whose case I believed that the source of sinus thrombophlebitis was not an otitic infection. In one case the condition was due to the spreading of a thrombus from the left lateral sinus to the healthy right side, and in the other two it was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THROMBOSIS OF THE LATERAL SINUS AND JUGULAR BULB OF NONOTITIC ORIGIN

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/thrombosis-of-the-lateral-sinus-and-jugular-bulb-of-nonotitic-origin-P1Y4JIYDpg
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970180095007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The diagnosis and mode of development of thrombophlebitis of the lateral sinus are usually fairly clear. A septic temperature and chills in the course of purulent otitis media, with or without evidence of mastoiditis, suggest thrombosis either of the lateral sinus or of the jugular bulb. Positive results of blood cultures at this time, as pointed out by Libman,1 are of great significance and usually indicate that operative treatment is imperative. In all such cases the otitic infection is the start. In contrast to sinus thrombosis secondary to otitis media, I have observed two children and have been interested in a third child in whose case I believed that the source of sinus thrombophlebitis was not an otitic infection. In one case the condition was due to the spreading of a thrombus from the left lateral sinus to the healthy right side, and in the other two it was

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1936

There are no references for this article.