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Thrombosis in Patients With a Circulating Anticoagulant

Thrombosis in Patients With a Circulating Anticoagulant Abstract Hemostatic defects are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), estimated as occurring in 20% of cases.1 The usual defects detected are thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, circulating anticoagulants, and hypoprothrombinemia. These hemostatic defects are thought to be due to autoantibodies. The circulating anticoagulants found in SLE are of two types as follows: one is called the "lupus anticoagulant" and the others are inhibitors directed against specific coagulation factors.2 The lupus anticoagulant is not a cause for hemorrhage unless it is associated with reduced factor II (hypoprothrombinemia), thrombocytopenia, and/or platelet dysfunction. Thrombotic disease, however, has been described in patients with this type of anticoagulant. Inhibitors against specific coagulation factors (eg, factors VIII, IX, and XI), on the other hand, cause a moderate to severe hemorrhagic condition that is clinically similar to the congenital factor deficiency diseases. In this issue, Bernstein et al call our attention to those patients References 1. Lee SL, Miotti A: Disorders of hemostatic function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus . Semin Arthritis Rheum 1975;4:241-252.Crossref 2. Shapiro SS, Thiagarajan P: Lupus anticoagulants . Prog Hemost Thromb 1982;6:263-285. 3. Bernstein ML, Salusinsky-Sternbach M, Bellefleur M, et al: Thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications in children with the lupus anticoagulant . AJDC 1984;138:1132-1135. 4. Dosekun AK, Pollak VE, Glas-Greenwalt P, et al: Ancrod in systemic lupus erythematosus with thrombosis . Arch Intern Med 1984;144: 37-42.Crossref 5. Landi G, Calloni MV, Sabbadini MG, et al: Recurrent ischemic attacks in two young adults with lupus anticoagulant . Stroke 1983;14:377-379.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Thrombosis in Patients With a Circulating Anticoagulant

Thrombosis in Patients With a Circulating Anticoagulant

Abstract

Abstract Hemostatic defects are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), estimated as occurring in 20% of cases.1 The usual defects detected are thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, circulating anticoagulants, and hypoprothrombinemia. These hemostatic defects are thought to be due to autoantibodies. The circulating anticoagulants found in SLE are of two types as follows: one is called the "lupus anticoagulant" and the others are inhibitors directed...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1984.02140500004002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Hemostatic defects are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), estimated as occurring in 20% of cases.1 The usual defects detected are thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, circulating anticoagulants, and hypoprothrombinemia. These hemostatic defects are thought to be due to autoantibodies. The circulating anticoagulants found in SLE are of two types as follows: one is called the "lupus anticoagulant" and the others are inhibitors directed against specific coagulation factors.2 The lupus anticoagulant is not a cause for hemorrhage unless it is associated with reduced factor II (hypoprothrombinemia), thrombocytopenia, and/or platelet dysfunction. Thrombotic disease, however, has been described in patients with this type of anticoagulant. Inhibitors against specific coagulation factors (eg, factors VIII, IX, and XI), on the other hand, cause a moderate to severe hemorrhagic condition that is clinically similar to the congenital factor deficiency diseases. In this issue, Bernstein et al call our attention to those patients References 1. Lee SL, Miotti A: Disorders of hemostatic function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus . Semin Arthritis Rheum 1975;4:241-252.Crossref 2. Shapiro SS, Thiagarajan P: Lupus anticoagulants . Prog Hemost Thromb 1982;6:263-285. 3. Bernstein ML, Salusinsky-Sternbach M, Bellefleur M, et al: Thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications in children with the lupus anticoagulant . AJDC 1984;138:1132-1135. 4. Dosekun AK, Pollak VE, Glas-Greenwalt P, et al: Ancrod in systemic lupus erythematosus with thrombosis . Arch Intern Med 1984;144: 37-42.Crossref 5. Landi G, Calloni MV, Sabbadini MG, et al: Recurrent ischemic attacks in two young adults with lupus anticoagulant . Stroke 1983;14:377-379.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1984

References