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Threads and Fine Threads

Threads and Fine Threads Abstract In Reply.— The key to the questions asked by Dr Pedro is that he has misquoted and consequently misinterpreted our statements concerning the relationship between threads and fine threads1-3 and the two separate antibodies to extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) of Sharp et al.4 A serum exchange with Gordon C. Sharp, MD, showed that the pattern he reported as speckles4 (also referred to as such in the cooperative study on immunofluorescence tests5) could in fact be separated morphologically into two patterns, threads and fine threads.1 We suggested that these two patterns might represent the two antibodies reported to be reactive with ENA.1 Specifically, we suggested that the fine threads might possibly represent the antibody to ribonucleasesensitive ENA, seen in patients with mixed connective tissue (MCT) disease,4 while the threads may be produced by the antibody to ribonuclease-resistant ENA,6 found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus References 1. Burnham TK, Bank PW: Antinuclear antibodies: I. Patterns of nuclear immunofluorescence . J Invest Dermatol 62:526-534, 1974.Crossref 2. Burnham TK: Editorial comments , in Melkerson FD, Pearson RW (eds): Year Book of Dermatology . Chicago, Year Book Medical Publishers Inc, 1974, pp 257-258. 3. Burnham TK: Antinuclear antibodies: II. The prognostic significance of nuclear immunofluorescent patterns in lupus erythematosus . Arch Dermatol 111:203-207, 1975.Crossref 4. Sharp GC, Irvin WS, Tan EM, et al: Mixed connective tissue disease: An apparently distinct rheumatic disease syndrome associated with a specific antibody to an extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) . Am J Med 52:148-159, 1972.Crossref 5. Uses for immunofluorescence tests of skin and sera: Utilization of immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, lupus erythematosus, and certain other dermatoses, Cooperative Study . Arch Dermatol 111:371-381, 1975.Crossref 6. Burnham TK: Antinuclear antibodies: Significance of nuclear staining patterns , in Beutner EH, Chorzelski TP, Bean SF, et al (eds): Immunopathology of the Skin: Labeled Antibody Studies . Stroudsburg, Pa, Dowden, Hutchinson & Ross Inc, 1973, pp 379-392. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Threads and Fine Threads

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 112 (1) – Jan 1, 1976

Threads and Fine Threads

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— The key to the questions asked by Dr Pedro is that he has misquoted and consequently misinterpreted our statements concerning the relationship between threads and fine threads1-3 and the two separate antibodies to extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) of Sharp et al.4 A serum exchange with Gordon C. Sharp, MD, showed that the pattern he reported as speckles4 (also referred to as such in the cooperative study on immunofluorescence tests5) could in fact be separated...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1976.01630250066025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— The key to the questions asked by Dr Pedro is that he has misquoted and consequently misinterpreted our statements concerning the relationship between threads and fine threads1-3 and the two separate antibodies to extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) of Sharp et al.4 A serum exchange with Gordon C. Sharp, MD, showed that the pattern he reported as speckles4 (also referred to as such in the cooperative study on immunofluorescence tests5) could in fact be separated morphologically into two patterns, threads and fine threads.1 We suggested that these two patterns might represent the two antibodies reported to be reactive with ENA.1 Specifically, we suggested that the fine threads might possibly represent the antibody to ribonucleasesensitive ENA, seen in patients with mixed connective tissue (MCT) disease,4 while the threads may be produced by the antibody to ribonuclease-resistant ENA,6 found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus References 1. Burnham TK, Bank PW: Antinuclear antibodies: I. Patterns of nuclear immunofluorescence . J Invest Dermatol 62:526-534, 1974.Crossref 2. Burnham TK: Editorial comments , in Melkerson FD, Pearson RW (eds): Year Book of Dermatology . Chicago, Year Book Medical Publishers Inc, 1974, pp 257-258. 3. Burnham TK: Antinuclear antibodies: II. The prognostic significance of nuclear immunofluorescent patterns in lupus erythematosus . Arch Dermatol 111:203-207, 1975.Crossref 4. Sharp GC, Irvin WS, Tan EM, et al: Mixed connective tissue disease: An apparently distinct rheumatic disease syndrome associated with a specific antibody to an extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) . Am J Med 52:148-159, 1972.Crossref 5. Uses for immunofluorescence tests of skin and sera: Utilization of immunofluorescence in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, lupus erythematosus, and certain other dermatoses, Cooperative Study . Arch Dermatol 111:371-381, 1975.Crossref 6. Burnham TK: Antinuclear antibodies: Significance of nuclear staining patterns , in Beutner EH, Chorzelski TP, Bean SF, et al (eds): Immunopathology of the Skin: Labeled Antibody Studies . Stroudsburg, Pa, Dowden, Hutchinson & Ross Inc, 1973, pp 379-392.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1976

References