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Therapeutic Studies in Experimental Chemical Injury of the Cornea: 1. Calsulfhydryl (Hydrosulphosol) Studies

Therapeutic Studies in Experimental Chemical Injury of the Cornea: 1. Calsulfhydryl... Abstract This investigation is part of a systematic survey to determine the efficacy of current and newly developed methods of treating chemical corneal injuries. From the gamut of drugs available for use in chemical burns, calsulfhydryl (Hydrosulphosol) was selected for early evaluation because of its relative newness as a therapeutic agent, and because of the wide difference of opinion as to its clinical value. Either chemical or mechanical rupture of cell membranes increases the oxidative activity of the damaged tissue. Supply of a supplementary reducing agent tends to counteract this effect and to restore a more nearly normal oxidation-reduction balance in the aerobic enzyme systems of the corneal epithelium. Free sulfhydryl groups, which contain readily available hydrogen and sulfur, theoretically provide the necessary reductive power. Calsulfhydryl, which contains a fairly high concentration of free sulfhydryl groups, has been recommended in the treatment of almost all types of corneal lesions on the References 1. Friedenwald, J. S.; Hughes, W. F., and Herrmann, H.: Acid Burns of the Eye , Arch. Ophth. 31:98, 1946.Crossref 2. Harley, R. D.: An Experimental Study on the Evaluation of Hydrosulphosol in the Treatment of Ocular Injuries Due to Chemical Burns , Am. J. Ophth. 35:1653-1673, 1952. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Therapeutic Studies in Experimental Chemical Injury of the Cornea: 1. Calsulfhydryl (Hydrosulphosol) Studies

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1955.00930020024004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This investigation is part of a systematic survey to determine the efficacy of current and newly developed methods of treating chemical corneal injuries. From the gamut of drugs available for use in chemical burns, calsulfhydryl (Hydrosulphosol) was selected for early evaluation because of its relative newness as a therapeutic agent, and because of the wide difference of opinion as to its clinical value. Either chemical or mechanical rupture of cell membranes increases the oxidative activity of the damaged tissue. Supply of a supplementary reducing agent tends to counteract this effect and to restore a more nearly normal oxidation-reduction balance in the aerobic enzyme systems of the corneal epithelium. Free sulfhydryl groups, which contain readily available hydrogen and sulfur, theoretically provide the necessary reductive power. Calsulfhydryl, which contains a fairly high concentration of free sulfhydryl groups, has been recommended in the treatment of almost all types of corneal lesions on the References 1. Friedenwald, J. S.; Hughes, W. F., and Herrmann, H.: Acid Burns of the Eye , Arch. Ophth. 31:98, 1946.Crossref 2. Harley, R. D.: An Experimental Study on the Evaluation of Hydrosulphosol in the Treatment of Ocular Injuries Due to Chemical Burns , Am. J. Ophth. 35:1653-1673, 1952.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1955

References

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