Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THERAPEUTIC ACTION OF POTASSIUM IODID IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS OF THE RABBIT

THERAPEUTIC ACTION OF POTASSIUM IODID IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS OF THE RABBIT Abstract Although the iodids have been employed in the treatment of syphilis for many years, their mode of action is still obscure. Clinical experience has shown that iodin compounds have little or no therapeutic effect in the early stages of the disease, due, it is asserted, to the absence of spirocheticidal action; and experimental confirmation of this opinion has been brought forward by Nichols,1 who found that the administration of the amount of potassium iodid tolerated by the body (rabbit) was without effect on the number and motility of the spirochetes of the primary chancre. On the other hand, Neisser2 reported that it was possible to prevent syphilis in the monkey with potassium iodid, if massive doses of from 7 to 8 gm. were administered subcutaneously at the time of or four days after inoculation; that is, no primary lesion was obtained; but Neisser does not state whether secondary References 1. Nichols, Henry J.: J. Exper. Med. 14:196, 1911.Crossref 2. Neisser, Albert: Arb. a. d. k. Gsndhtsamte 37:306, 1911. 3. Jobling, J. W., and Peterson, W. F.: Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 26:356, 1915. 4. Additional studies with potassium iodid, which will be reported elsewhere, show that the commonly accepted views of the toxicology of this substance may need to be subjected to considerable revision. For this reason, no attempt is made to relate the amount of drug employed to a minimum lethal or a tolerated dose. 5. Group B ultimately comprised five rabbits, as Rabbit 4 was killed seventeen days after inoculation because of an accidental injury. At this time, no positive diagnosis of a primary lesion could be made. In addition, it should be noted that Rabbit 1 of Group B had no left testis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

THERAPEUTIC ACTION OF POTASSIUM IODID IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS OF THE RABBIT

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/therapeutic-action-of-potassium-iodid-in-experimental-syphilis-of-the-w1pZUeHFwG
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1925.02370070014001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although the iodids have been employed in the treatment of syphilis for many years, their mode of action is still obscure. Clinical experience has shown that iodin compounds have little or no therapeutic effect in the early stages of the disease, due, it is asserted, to the absence of spirocheticidal action; and experimental confirmation of this opinion has been brought forward by Nichols,1 who found that the administration of the amount of potassium iodid tolerated by the body (rabbit) was without effect on the number and motility of the spirochetes of the primary chancre. On the other hand, Neisser2 reported that it was possible to prevent syphilis in the monkey with potassium iodid, if massive doses of from 7 to 8 gm. were administered subcutaneously at the time of or four days after inoculation; that is, no primary lesion was obtained; but Neisser does not state whether secondary References 1. Nichols, Henry J.: J. Exper. Med. 14:196, 1911.Crossref 2. Neisser, Albert: Arb. a. d. k. Gsndhtsamte 37:306, 1911. 3. Jobling, J. W., and Peterson, W. F.: Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 26:356, 1915. 4. Additional studies with potassium iodid, which will be reported elsewhere, show that the commonly accepted views of the toxicology of this substance may need to be subjected to considerable revision. For this reason, no attempt is made to relate the amount of drug employed to a minimum lethal or a tolerated dose. 5. Group B ultimately comprised five rabbits, as Rabbit 4 was killed seventeen days after inoculation because of an accidental injury. At this time, no positive diagnosis of a primary lesion could be made. In addition, it should be noted that Rabbit 1 of Group B had no left testis.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1925

References