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The War Against Skin Cancer

The War Against Skin Cancer EDITORIAL The Time for Action Is Now KIN CANCER IS DIAGNOSED IN MORE THAN the same lines, Feldman and Fleischer found that, among 1.5 million Americans each year. Alarm- 787 million office visits, physicians provided skin can- ingly, this staggering number is projected to cer prevention counseling to only 1.5% of their adult pa- continue to grow. Although some contro- tients and to even fewer adolescent patients. Counsel- S versy exists about the cause of skin cancer, ing was most often provided to high-risk patients or it is well accepted that excessive exposure to solar UV patients with a history of skin cancer. These studies and radiation is the major cause. As such, skin cancers are others highlight the glaring need for consensus among arguably the most easily preventable and treatable of all dermatologists about the frequency and quality of skin neoplasms. Nevertheless, public perception of skin can- cancer preventive counseling and screening, as well as cer, which tends to trivialize the disease, remains noto- the need for methods of providing such services in a more riously recalcitrant to change. standardized manner. See also pages 491 and 526 CURRENT STATUS OF PREVENTION EFFORTS In the last 30 years, many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

The War Against Skin Cancer

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 141 (4) – Apr 1, 2005

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2005 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/archderm.141.4.499
pmid
15837869
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL The Time for Action Is Now KIN CANCER IS DIAGNOSED IN MORE THAN the same lines, Feldman and Fleischer found that, among 1.5 million Americans each year. Alarm- 787 million office visits, physicians provided skin can- ingly, this staggering number is projected to cer prevention counseling to only 1.5% of their adult pa- continue to grow. Although some contro- tients and to even fewer adolescent patients. Counsel- S versy exists about the cause of skin cancer, ing was most often provided to high-risk patients or it is well accepted that excessive exposure to solar UV patients with a history of skin cancer. These studies and radiation is the major cause. As such, skin cancers are others highlight the glaring need for consensus among arguably the most easily preventable and treatable of all dermatologists about the frequency and quality of skin neoplasms. Nevertheless, public perception of skin can- cancer preventive counseling and screening, as well as cer, which tends to trivialize the disease, remains noto- the need for methods of providing such services in a more riously recalcitrant to change. standardized manner. See also pages 491 and 526 CURRENT STATUS OF PREVENTION EFFORTS In the last 30 years, many

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2005

References