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The Value of Interviewing Family and Friends in Assessing Life Stressors

The Value of Interviewing Family and Friends in Assessing Life Stressors Abstract • A reliability study of a life events questionnaire administered to 117 pairs of respondents indicated that a "significant other" (family member or friend) added approximately 29% new information to that gathered from the patient alone. A validity check of this information with a "knowledgeable" third party confirmed approximately 80% of the events reported by the subjects and significant others. The findings suggest that studies designed to collect information about the occurrence of specific life stressors would obtain more reliable and no less valid data from separate interviews of patients and significant others, and the pooling of the positive responses obtained from these two sources. References 1. Schless AP, Mendels J: Life events and psychopathology . Psychiatr Digest 38:25-35, 1977. 2. Hudgens RW, Robins E, Delong WB: The reporting of recent stress in the lives of psychiatric patients . Br J Psychiatry 117:635-643, 1970.Crossref 3. Rahe RH, Romo M, Bennett LK, et al: Finnish Subjects' Recent Life Changes, Myocardial Infarction and Abrupt Coronary Death . San Diego, US Navy Medical Neuropsychiatric Research Unit Report 72-40, 1973. 4. Brown GW, Sklair F, Harris TO, et al: Life-events and psychiatric disorders: I. Some methodological issues . Psychol Med 3:74-87, 1973.Crossref 5. Holmes TH, Rahe RH: The social readjustment rating scale . J Psychosom Res 11:213-217, 1967.Crossref 6. Ilfeld FW Jr: Current social stressors and symptoms of depression . Am J Psychiatry 134:161-166, 1977. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

The Value of Interviewing Family and Friends in Assessing Life Stressors

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1978.01770290047004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • A reliability study of a life events questionnaire administered to 117 pairs of respondents indicated that a "significant other" (family member or friend) added approximately 29% new information to that gathered from the patient alone. A validity check of this information with a "knowledgeable" third party confirmed approximately 80% of the events reported by the subjects and significant others. The findings suggest that studies designed to collect information about the occurrence of specific life stressors would obtain more reliable and no less valid data from separate interviews of patients and significant others, and the pooling of the positive responses obtained from these two sources. References 1. Schless AP, Mendels J: Life events and psychopathology . Psychiatr Digest 38:25-35, 1977. 2. Hudgens RW, Robins E, Delong WB: The reporting of recent stress in the lives of psychiatric patients . Br J Psychiatry 117:635-643, 1970.Crossref 3. Rahe RH, Romo M, Bennett LK, et al: Finnish Subjects' Recent Life Changes, Myocardial Infarction and Abrupt Coronary Death . San Diego, US Navy Medical Neuropsychiatric Research Unit Report 72-40, 1973. 4. Brown GW, Sklair F, Harris TO, et al: Life-events and psychiatric disorders: I. Some methodological issues . Psychol Med 3:74-87, 1973.Crossref 5. Holmes TH, Rahe RH: The social readjustment rating scale . J Psychosom Res 11:213-217, 1967.Crossref 6. Ilfeld FW Jr: Current social stressors and symptoms of depression . Am J Psychiatry 134:161-166, 1977.

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1978

References