Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE USE OF ELECTRICITY BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER.

THE USE OF ELECTRICITY BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER. In the successful prosecution of any line of work it is necessary to have good tools to work with, and in no calling is this more important than in the treatment of disease, the relief of suffering and the prolongation of life, which are, or should be, the aim of every physician. Were we to examine the armamentaria of the general practitioners of medicine, we would find that where they had electrical apparatus it would, as a rule, be the farthest from up-to-date of any appliances they might have. The reasons for this are twofold: first, the market is flooded with, so far as treatment of disease is concerned, worthless but not always cheap electrical appliances, the fancied merits of these machines being constantly paraded before the medical profession by manufacturers and selling agents; second, physicians are not sufficiently well informed as to what they should or should not buy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE USE OF ELECTRICITY BY THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (17) – Oct 22, 1898

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-use-of-electricity-by-the-general-practitioner-zUAwd2TOQ1
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.92450170022002e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the successful prosecution of any line of work it is necessary to have good tools to work with, and in no calling is this more important than in the treatment of disease, the relief of suffering and the prolongation of life, which are, or should be, the aim of every physician. Were we to examine the armamentaria of the general practitioners of medicine, we would find that where they had electrical apparatus it would, as a rule, be the farthest from up-to-date of any appliances they might have. The reasons for this are twofold: first, the market is flooded with, so far as treatment of disease is concerned, worthless but not always cheap electrical appliances, the fancied merits of these machines being constantly paraded before the medical profession by manufacturers and selling agents; second, physicians are not sufficiently well informed as to what they should or should not buy.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 22, 1898

There are no references for this article.