Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Use of Dihydroxyacetone for Skin Tanning

The Use of Dihydroxyacetone for Skin Tanning Abstract Within the past year a number of similar cosmetic preparations have appeared on the market and have been extensively advertised for their "tanning" effect on the skin. In our practices we have received numerous inquiries regarding their effectiveness and safety. There seems to be a general impression on the part of the laity that the artificial tan which these agents produce will protect against sunlight. This investigation was undertaken to determine the possible sun-screening properties and effect upon melanogenesis of dihydroxyacetone, the active ingredient in these preparations. Experiment I Ten healthy white male volunteers were used. Three test areas, each measuring 1×1 inch (2.5×2.5 cm.), were marked out on the external aspect of one arm of each subject. Dihydroxyacetone lotion* was applied to one of these test sites. Twenty-four hours later this site was given a 4+ erythema dose of ultraviolet light produced by Westinghouse FS4OT-12 fluorescent ultraviolet lamp. The References 1. Man Tan. The active concentration of dihydroxyacetone in this preparation is unknown, but a preparation containing 2% of this ingredient in 50% isopropyl alcohol rendered an identical clinical effect. 2. Janssen, W. F.: Personal communication to the author, May 9, 1960, Director, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Pure Food and Drug Administration, Washington, D.C. 3. Markson, L. S.: Effect of "Man Tan," A.M.A. Arch. Dermat. 81:989 ( (June) ) 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

The Use of Dihydroxyacetone for Skin Tanning

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-use-of-dihydroxyacetone-for-skin-tanning-BXNWgJrlqV
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1961.01580090087011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Within the past year a number of similar cosmetic preparations have appeared on the market and have been extensively advertised for their "tanning" effect on the skin. In our practices we have received numerous inquiries regarding their effectiveness and safety. There seems to be a general impression on the part of the laity that the artificial tan which these agents produce will protect against sunlight. This investigation was undertaken to determine the possible sun-screening properties and effect upon melanogenesis of dihydroxyacetone, the active ingredient in these preparations. Experiment I Ten healthy white male volunteers were used. Three test areas, each measuring 1×1 inch (2.5×2.5 cm.), were marked out on the external aspect of one arm of each subject. Dihydroxyacetone lotion* was applied to one of these test sites. Twenty-four hours later this site was given a 4+ erythema dose of ultraviolet light produced by Westinghouse FS4OT-12 fluorescent ultraviolet lamp. The References 1. Man Tan. The active concentration of dihydroxyacetone in this preparation is unknown, but a preparation containing 2% of this ingredient in 50% isopropyl alcohol rendered an identical clinical effect. 2. Janssen, W. F.: Personal communication to the author, May 9, 1960, Director, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Pure Food and Drug Administration, Washington, D.C. 3. Markson, L. S.: Effect of "Man Tan," A.M.A. Arch. Dermat. 81:989 ( (June) ) 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1961

References