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The Ultrasonic Velocity Detector in a Clinical Study of Venous Disease

The Ultrasonic Velocity Detector in a Clinical Study of Venous Disease Abstract THE CLINICAL evaluation of diseases involving the venous system has been hampered somewhat by the lack of ancillary diagnostic aids. Aside from the history and physical examination, the only readily available methods of study are venography and venous pressure measurements. These techniques have not generally been accepted with the same enthusiasm as arteriography or plethysmography have in arterial disease because it is only in special circumstances that the findings directly influence the type of therapy to be employed. While it is certainly true that there are entities such as varicose veins, superficial thrombophlebitis, and iliofemoral thrombosis which are often simple to diagnose, there are many situations in which additional information would be desirable. The recent introduction of the ultrasonic velocity detector has provided us with a new method of obtaining qualitative information relative to venous dynamics hitherto unavailable. Because of its simplicity of operation and versatility, the detector is proving References 1. Rushmer, R.F.; Baker, D.W.; and Stegall, H.F.: Transcutaneous Doppler Flow Detection as a Nondestructive Technique , J Appl Physiol 21:554-566 ( (March) ) 1966. 2. Strandness, D.E., Jr., et al: Ultrasonic Flow Detection: A Useful Technic in the Evaluation of Peripheral Vascular Disease , Amer J Surg 113:311-320 ( (March) ) 1967.Crossref 3. Sigel, B., et al: Diagnosis of Venous Disease by Ultrasonic Flow Detection , Surg Forum 18:185-187, 1967. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

The Ultrasonic Velocity Detector in a Clinical Study of Venous Disease

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1968.01340010105011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE CLINICAL evaluation of diseases involving the venous system has been hampered somewhat by the lack of ancillary diagnostic aids. Aside from the history and physical examination, the only readily available methods of study are venography and venous pressure measurements. These techniques have not generally been accepted with the same enthusiasm as arteriography or plethysmography have in arterial disease because it is only in special circumstances that the findings directly influence the type of therapy to be employed. While it is certainly true that there are entities such as varicose veins, superficial thrombophlebitis, and iliofemoral thrombosis which are often simple to diagnose, there are many situations in which additional information would be desirable. The recent introduction of the ultrasonic velocity detector has provided us with a new method of obtaining qualitative information relative to venous dynamics hitherto unavailable. Because of its simplicity of operation and versatility, the detector is proving References 1. Rushmer, R.F.; Baker, D.W.; and Stegall, H.F.: Transcutaneous Doppler Flow Detection as a Nondestructive Technique , J Appl Physiol 21:554-566 ( (March) ) 1966. 2. Strandness, D.E., Jr., et al: Ultrasonic Flow Detection: A Useful Technic in the Evaluation of Peripheral Vascular Disease , Amer J Surg 113:311-320 ( (March) ) 1967.Crossref 3. Sigel, B., et al: Diagnosis of Venous Disease by Ultrasonic Flow Detection , Surg Forum 18:185-187, 1967.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1968

References